united states – Newton County MO Tourism http://newtoncountymotourism.org/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 10:35:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-57.png united states – Newton County MO Tourism http://newtoncountymotourism.org/ 32 32 Here’s why sanctions on Russia might not work https://newtoncountymotourism.org/heres-why-sanctions-on-russia-might-not-work/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 09:04:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/heres-why-sanctions-on-russia-might-not-work/ Refilwe Moloto speaks with a panel of experts on the effectiveness of the sanctions currently imposed on Russia. – Over the past fortnight, the US, UK and their allies have imposed various trade and banking sanctions on Russia – On Tuesday, McDonald’s, Coca-Cola and Starbucks bowed to public pressure and suspended operations in Russia © […]]]>

Refilwe Moloto speaks with a panel of experts on the effectiveness of the sanctions currently imposed on Russia.

– Over the past fortnight, the US, UK and their allies have imposed various trade and banking sanctions on Russia

– On Tuesday, McDonald’s, Coca-Cola and Starbucks bowed to public pressure and suspended operations in Russia


© alfexe/123rf.com

US President Joe Biden has announced that the United States is banning all oil and gas imports from Russia

Speaking on Tuesday morning, Biden said the move targeted “the main artery of Russia’s economy.”

It comes as McDonald’s, Coca-Cola and Starbucks bowed to public pressure on Tuesday and suspended operations in Russia, joining the international chorus of corporate outrage over Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine.

Over the past fortnight, the United States, United Kingdom and their allies have imposed sanctions on Russia, including trade and banking sanctions, including the removal of certain Russian banks from the Swift messaging system,

But what sanctions on Russia are likely to work?

CapeTalk’s Refilwe Moloto posed the question to a panel of experts on Wednesday.

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to applying sanctions.

Christopher Michaelsen, Associate Professor at the School of Global and Public Law – UNSW

It’s about creating a groundswell of Russian resistance to the war that will put pressure on Putin.

Dr. Greg Mills, Director – Brenthurst Foundation

The problem with sanctions, says Dr. Greg Mills of the Brenthurst Foundation, is that sanctions can take a while to have an impact:

It probably won’t be fast enough for the Ukrainians.

Dr. Greg Mills, Director – Brenthurst Foundation

This may increase the cost for Mr Putin, but it is unlikely to affect his current plans given his level of engagement in Ukraine.

Dr. Greg Mills, Director – Brenthurst Foundation

RELATED:US and allies start imposing sanctions, ‘but that has never deterred Russia before’

RELATED: “Russians panic as payment system sanctions cause breach of trust”


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USDA and Windsor officials visit Future Legends as work continues on 118-acre sports complex – Greeley Tribune https://newtoncountymotourism.org/usda-and-windsor-officials-visit-future-legends-as-work-continues-on-118-acre-sports-complex-greeley-tribune/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 04:09:43 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/usda-and-windsor-officials-visit-future-legends-as-work-continues-on-118-acre-sports-complex-greeley-tribune/ The rural landscapes of the United States are changing as communities adapt to new economic realities. The city of Windsor, once known for its thriving sugar beet industry, is home to a prime example of these changes, a U.S. Department of Agriculture official noted on Wednesday during a tour of the 118-mile Future Legends Sports […]]]>

The rural landscapes of the United States are changing as communities adapt to new economic realities.

The city of Windsor, once known for its thriving sugar beet industry, is home to a prime example of these changes, a U.S. Department of Agriculture official noted on Wednesday during a tour of the 118-mile Future Legends Sports Complex. acres.

“For viability, economic sustainability, here’s what’s happening: you see this landscape changing,” said Armando Valdez, Colorado state director of rural development at the USDA.

With more than 20 sports fields, a stadium that can accommodate thousands of people, a specialized field for athletes with physical disabilities, two hotels, nearly 80,000 square feet of retail space, an inflatable dome covering 4 acres, an esports arena and more, Future Legends is set to bring major changes to East Windsor and the region as a whole. On Wednesday, Future Legends founder Jeff Katofsky led Valdez, along with Windsor Mayor Paul Rennemeyer and City Manager Shane Hale, on a tour of the complex, which is under construction.

Valdez, who grew up on a farm and ranch in Colorado, said he’s passionate about keeping agriculture viable, but investing in rural communities by diversifying the economy is key to keeping communities vibrant. rural areas. Future Legends received a $13 million business and industry loan guarantee this month through Rural Development’s Business Programs Division.

The entrance to the stadium is seen during a tour of the Future Legends Sports Complex in Windsor on Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2022. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided the project with a $13 million loan guarantee through its rural development division.

The guarantee gives traditional lenders extra confidence that they can move forward with almost no risk to them, Valdez explained. If something were to happen to a project, rural development could prevent default on 80% of the loan.

The guarantee was part of a $1.4 billion investment by the Department of Agriculture to help rural America keep resources and wealth at home through skills training, business expansion and technical assistance, according to a press release from the agency. Business and industry loan guarantees provided record investment last year.

By encouraging investment in projects like Future Legends, Valdez hopes to see a multiplier effect breathing new life into communities across the state.

“It’s not just $1 in, $1 out. We put in $1 hoping to get $3, $4 or $5,” he said. “A project like this can have a significant multiplier effect.”

Katofsky is using Jaco General Contractor, a company based in Wichita, Kansas, for the project after issues with Hensel Phelps Construction Co. of Greeley. John Walker, president of Jaco, said nearly all of the project’s contractors are based in Colorado.

Keeping businesses local will continue to be a priority once the complex is operational, Katofsky said. With dormitories for the teams and on-site hotels, project officials expect to bring approximately 3,000 people to the resort during the stay-and-play tournaments. The retail space will primarily consist of restaurants, offering to those staying nearby have options beyond the typical stadium concessions.

The stadium – which will host USL League One’s Northern Colorado Hailstorm FC and the Pioneer League’s Northern Colorado Owlz – will be able to accommodate up to 22,000 fans for concerts, 6,500 for football matches and 5,500 for games baseball. A secondary stadium will be able to accommodate up to 2,500 people for football games and baseball games. The esports arena, slated to open next year, will accommodate around 1,000 people.

Two hotels will be attached to the main stadium: a Hilton Garden Inn and a Hampton by Hilton. Most will have a view of all the matches taking place inside the stadium.

Jeff Katofsky, founder of Future Legends, shows where two hotels are being built during a tour of the Future Legends sports complex in Windsor on Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2022. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has given the project a loan guarantee $13 million through its Rural Development Division.

Valdez said the resort has serious implications for the future of recreational tourism in the region. Katofsky added that youth sports alone is a growing $19 billion industry.

One feature that will stand out is an inflatable dome that will contain a soccer field and multi-purpose courts that can be set up for eight basketball courts or 16 volleyball courts. The dome, which will be one of the tallest structures in Windsor at 96 feet tall, is a mild steel system over three layers of insulating fabric. Katofsky said the structure would hold about 9 million cubic feet of air.

The athlete dorm, which will accommodate 64 teams, will have enhanced security features including an RFID wristband, 24/7 on-site security and facial recognition – the latter of which can be disabled by parents.

“It’s exciting,” Valdez said. “The American people’s money is invested in this multiplier effect.”

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The Nucor deal is an example of how development incentives should work | State newspaper notice https://newtoncountymotourism.org/the-nucor-deal-is-an-example-of-how-development-incentives-should-work-state-newspaper-notice/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/the-nucor-deal-is-an-example-of-how-development-incentives-should-work-state-newspaper-notice/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, […]]]>

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BNPL’s Growing Role in Unsecured Lending https://newtoncountymotourism.org/bnpls-growing-role-in-unsecured-lending/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 18:11:16 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/bnpls-growing-role-in-unsecured-lending/ Paying for goods according to the installment plan is not a new method of payment, but it has resurfaced in response to increased consumer interest. “Buy now, pay later” gives consumers more control over how much they spend and where they spend it. It also gives them more freedom to buy the things they want, […]]]>

Paying for goods according to the installment plan is not a new method of payment, but it has resurfaced in response to increased consumer interest. “Buy now, pay later” gives consumers more control over how much they spend and where they spend it. It also gives them more freedom to buy the things they want, even without having enough money in their account.

In the United States, point-of-sale (POS) financing services have increased significantly, particularly due to restrictions related to COVID-19. Usage among the younger demographic has greatly influenced BNPL’s growth, while banking digitalization has boosted merchant adoption.

Currently, players in the fintech market are taking the lead when it comes to BNPL, and so far only a handful of banks have reacted quickly enough to be competitive. To avoid significant losses in the future, banks need to understand the current POS financing landscape and choose a model that works best for their new customers.

New business opportunities with POS loans

Traditional banks and financial institutions should see the growth of POS funding models as a signal to rethink the lending landscape and their role in it. With fintech siphoning off most of the value of banks’ point-of-sale funding, estimated at $8-10 billion so far, it’s evident that this is a very profitable market.

Another important factor is that most users engaged in online banking are young, tech-savvy millennials and Generation Z. If banks want to see their long-term goals achieved and attract the attention of these young users , they should focus on
make these changes in the system

  • Integration throughout the purchase journey
  • Rethinking risk models
  • Different approaches to credit

Integration throughout the purchase journey

As fintech works to create a complete customer buying journey, banks are falling behind. Onboarding can help scale and inspire younger generations to give banks greater visibility. Using rewards and subsidizing credit reward costs will bring more value to customers and ultimately increase their loyalty.

Rethinking risk models

Consumer expectations are increasing every day, especially with merchant subsidies. It is time for banks to rethink and update their risk models to meet these expectations. One possible solution could be merchant partnerships, as merchants play a key role as intermediaries in this model.

Different approaches to credit

The difference between traditional credit products, installment credit cards and debit cards with new features is becoming increasingly blurred. Banks that start offering credit products in the format their customers want will gain valuable benefits and profit.

Everyone, whether neobanks, card issuers, lenders or merchant acquirers, are competing for market share. By offering BNPL options, they can see how users interact with their platforms and find the right business model to stay afloat in a dynamic market.

It is clear that Buy Now, Pay Later is growing rapidly. Indeed, results from McKinsey’s 2021 Digital Payments Survey suggest that BNPL usage may actually be growing faster than its penetration.

Distinct models Buy now, pay later

As not all POS systems work the same way, the description of the systems used in the different financial markets shows how the service has evolved over a short period of time. At the same time, banks can gain a better understanding of what they are competing against and how they could outperform it.

1. Finance midsize purchases with off-card solutions
Solutions like Uplift and Affirm, which allow you to repay in monthly installments, are ideal for small and medium purchases. On average, the note size is between $250 and $2,500 and the time to repay the loan is around 8-9 months. Products purchased in this way are typically appliances, electronics, home fitness equipment, and furniture.

Most of these transactions are done digitally, and their growth is fueled by increased adoption among users with higher credit scores. However, consumers are unlikely to use this financing strategy more than a few times per year.

2. Post-Purchase Card Payments
This financing solution is popular in Asia and Latin America, although adoption rates are still quite low in the United States. Since the post-purchase refund strategy has a higher APR than other point-of-sale purchase solutions, it is less popular. However, a big advantage after purchase is the ability for merchants to use it with special offers. Card-linked payouts are currently available through services like Splitit or network solutions like Visa Payouts.

3. Shopping App Integration
The aspiration of most major shopping apps is to become “super apps”. Major market players such as PayPal’s “Pay In 4” offer services that follow customers throughout the purchase journey. Moreover, they are gradually gaining momentum. Unless banks find a way to increase their exposure, they might not be competitive at the same level and expect to suffer losses in the near future.

Pay in 4 focuses on small purchases that are typically under $250, with installments users can pay off in six weeks. Services like Afterpay have seen phenomenal growth fueled by the pandemic lockdown. With more merchants integrating these products into their payment offerings, the increase of more than 300% in 2020 could prove to be even greater in 2021. McKinsey estimates that Pay in 4 could generate between $4 and $6 billion in revenue by 2023.

Major market players recognize this trend towards integration. To secure their market positions, many have decided to integrate Etsy.com with Klarna and Houzz.com with Afterpay.

Why Consumers Use BNPL
Convenience. BNPL loans require a down payment or “down payment”, for example 25% of the purchase amount. The remaining amount is then repaid in installments over a few weeks or months.

Zero or low interest rate. BNPL loans do not include additional interest or bank charges, but they can come with a fixed repayment schedule.

Flexible credit check. To prevent fraudulent behavior, a soft credit check is performed to confirm the buyer’s identity. There will be no credit check or underwriting in the process.

Easy approval process. One of the most popular features of BNPL is the quick and easy approval process. Not only does this not affect credit scores, but it is irrelevant to other creditors.

How Banks Can Leverage POS Financing

Banks interested in getting involved in POS financing solutions can choose from different financing models. Each presents a unique opportunity as it forces banks to understand cost, time to market and customer segmentation.

Lease your balance to a BNPL company

One of the examples of collaboration between banks and BNPL companies is the model chosen by Cross River Bank and Affirm. Cross River provides Affirm with banking services so that they can endorse microfinance solutions.

Integrate credit card payments

As the BNPL market continues to grow, some banks have decided to integrate installments with existing credit cards. JP Morgan has developed Citi Flex Pay & Chase Pan to allow its customers to reimburse their purchases in installments. The strategy of adding new features to existing products or developing new financing products is a good way to meet customer needs, especially since most of them have started using alternative financing options. to avoid paying exorbitant interest on credit cards.

Take over a BNPL company
The market value of some of BNPL’s biggest players is estimated to be in the billions of dollars. AfterPay and Klarna have grown so much that even well-known market players like Mastercard, Apple Pay and Goldman Sachs have decided to offer new ways to use installments. However, as a stand-alone model, BNPL does not appear to be viable.

Develop your own BNPL solution
Some banks and financial institutions are ready to meet the needs of their customers and offer in-house developed POS financing solutions. If they want to compete with fintech, their advantage could be a partnership that allows them to build a unique product with the bespoke features their customers need.

Last word
Traditional lenders, brick-and-mortar banks, and neo-banks are all scrambling to find their footing in the POS financing market. Fierce competition will force them to use their assets to fuel the right business models and enter the market with competitive products.

What we can be certain of is the underlying need that drives customers and how point-of-sale financing addresses it. The digitization of major banking systems prevents some commercial banks from implementing clear strategies to enter this market. But with the ever expanding market scale, POS financing is here to stay.

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Space tourism took off in 2021, here’s how it went https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-took-off-in-2021-heres-how-it-went/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-took-off-in-2021-heres-how-it-went/ Launch of Blue Origin’s New Shepard rocket carrying passengers Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and … [+] space tourism company Blue Origin, brother Mark Bezos, Oliver Daemen and Wally Funk from its spaceport near Van Horn, Texas, Tuesday, July 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez) ASSOCIATED PRESS After years – even decades – of waiting, 2021 […]]]>

After years – even decades – of waiting, 2021 was the year space tourism finally kicked off. In the space of 10 short days in July, the commercial spaceflight industry took two leaps and bounds as Virgin Galactic and Blue Origin successfully completed their first flights with paying customers on board.

Although we still don’t have commercial space stations and prices are extremely unaffordable for all but the 1% of the 1%, space tourism is officially here – and here to stay.

Here are some of the highlights of the year’s successful launches and missions, and the people who joined the ranks of “commercial astronauts” as a result of their flights.

July 11 – Virgin Galactic’s first flight

Always one to put on a show, Sir Richard Branson was the first commercial customer to fly into space with his company, Virgin Galactic, in early July. The announcement came quickly, as Branson wanted to reach the edge of space before its competitor, Blue Origin – which it did just 9 days earlier. Branson was joined on board by three VG employees: chief astronaut instructor Beth Moses, vice president of government affairs and researcher Sirisha Bandla (who conducted in-flight experiments), and chief operations engineer by VG Colin Bennett.

On the ground before, during and after the flight from Spaceport America in New Mexico, non-flying guests were treated to a variety of entertainment, including a performance by Khalid.

July 20 – First flight of Blue Origin

On July 20, 52 years after the first moon landing, Blue Origin conducted its first successful consumer flight with founder Jeff Bezos on board. The company launched from its West Texas facility with four passengers on board: Bezos, his brother, aerospace legend Wally Funk, and 18-year-old Oliver Daemen, whose father was one of the bidders. from Blue Origin’s auction for the final seat.

(Anonymous auction winner pulled out days before launch, we later learned was tech/crypto founder Justin Sun, who is now considering buying an entire Blue Origin flight in the future.)

September 15 – Mission Inspiration4

One of the biggest and most enjoyable space tourism stories of the year focused on the Inspiration4 mission, organized and led by US billionaire Jared Isaacman. Isaacman bought a four-person flight on one of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsules and organized his crew which included medical assistant Hayley Arceneaux, geoscientist and science communication specialist Sian Proctor and data engineer Chris Sembroski , the latter two of which won their place through fundraising. campaign for St. Jude Children’s Hospital, where Arceneaux works.

The Inspiration4 crew launched from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A in Florida and spent three days in orbit before crashing off the coast of Florida.

October 13 – Beam Me Up, Scotty

For their second consumer flight, Blue Origin made headlines by inviting none other than Captain Kirk himself to join the flight as a guest. The inimitable William Shatner became the oldest person to visit space at 90 and said it was one of the highlights of his life: “I was so fascinated by what happened passed on this flight. It moved me to tears, so much so that…I couldn’t control my emotions for 15-20 minutes,” Shatner told TIME. in an interview after his flight.

December 8 – First ISS tourist (in a while)

For more than a decade, the only visitors to the International Space Station have been astronauts focused on research and other science projects – and a Russian actress/director who visited earlier in 2021 to film scenes for an upcoming movie. In some ways, it seemed like the days of welcoming tourists to the ISS were over; Canadian businessman Guy Laliberté was the last to go there in 2009.

That changed in December, when Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa arrived with a videographer to spend 12 days aboard the station. Up there, he answered common questions about life in microgravity (including classic toilet problems) and also did some fun experiments to spark interest in space.

Maezawa is expected to perform a flight around the moon with SpaceX at some point in the future; the trip was proposed for 2023 but not confirmed.

December 11 – Hello Earth

To close the year, Blue Origin completed a third successful flight in early December. In addition to several paying customers, including passengers hello america host Michael Strahan and Laura Shepard Churchley, daughter of astronaut Alan Shepard, the first American to reach space and who Blue Origin’s New Shepard the rocket bears his name.

As well as being a TV host, Strahan has a background in professional football and tweeted “TOUCHDOWN has new meaning now!!!” upon his successful return to earth.

Here are more successful flights in 2022, long-time reservations filled for Virgin Galactic patient customers and falling prices.

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2021: a year of space tourism, the rise of China https://newtoncountymotourism.org/2021-a-year-of-space-tourism-the-rise-of-china/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/2021-a-year-of-space-tourism-the-rise-of-china/ From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors. Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew […]]]>

From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors.

Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew entered orbit, and Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth explanation of what it was like to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism was finally taking off. .
Here are the selected highlights.

Red Planet Robot Duo

NASA’s Perseverance Rover has survived its “seven minutes of terror”, a period when the craft relies on its automated systems for descent and landing, to land safely on Mars’ Jezero crater in February.

Since then, the car-sized robot has been taking pictures and drilling samples for its mission: to determine if the Red Planet may have harbored ancient microbial lifeforms.

A rock sample return mission is planned for some time in the 2030s.

With its advanced instruments, “Percy”, as the helicopter is affectionately nicknamed, can also zap Martian rock and chemically analyze steam.

Percy has a partner for the ride: Ingenuity, a four-pound (two-kilogram) rotorcraft that achieved the first powered flight on another celestial body in April, just over a century after the Wright brothers achieved the same feat here on Earth. , and has played many more since.

“Perseverance is kind of the flagship mission, it’s doing a detailed, long-term investigation of this fascinating region of Mars,” Jonathan McDowall, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told AFP.

In contrast, “Ingenuity is one of those cute, small, cheap little tech demos that NASA can do so well,” he added.

Knowledge gained from Ingenuity could help scientists develop Dragonfly, a planned thousand-pound drone helicopter, to search for signs of life on Saturn’s moon Titan in the mid-2030s.

Private space flight takes off

An American millionaire became the world’s first space tourist in 2001, but it took another 20 years for the promise of private spaceflight to finally materialize.

In July, Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson competed against Blue Origin’s Jeff Bezos to be the first non-professional astronaut to perform suborbital spaceflight.

While the British tycoon won that battle within days, it was Blue Origin that took the lead, launching three more flights with paying customers and celebrities.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX entered the fray in September with a three-day orbital mission around Earth with an all-civilian crew on Inspiration 4.

“It’s really exciting that finally, after so long, this stuff is finally happening,” said space industry analyst Laura Seward Forczyk, author of the forthcoming book “Becoming Off-Worldly,” intended to prepare future space travelers.

But it was William Shatner, who played the swordsman Captain Kirk in the 1960s TV series “Star Trek,” who stole the show with a moving account of his experience.

“What you despise is Mother Earth, and she needs to be protected,” he told reporters.

A Russian crew shot the first feature film in space aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2021, and Japanese tourists took their own tour there aboard a Russian rocket.

For a few minutes on December 11, there were a record 19 humans in space when Blue Origin flew its third crewed mission, the Japanese team was on the ISS with their normal crew, and the Chinese taikonauts were in position on their station.

However, the sight of wealthy elites galloping through the cosmos did not please everyone, and the nascent space tourism industry sparked a backlash from some who said there were more problems. pressing issues to face, such as climate change, here on Earth.

Globalization of space

During the Cold War, space was dominated by the United States and the former Soviet Union.

Now, in addition to the explosion of the commercial sector, which is sending out satellites at a dizzying rate, China, India and others are increasingly flexing their spaceflight muscles.

China’s Tiangong (Palace in the Sky) space station – its first long-term outpost – launched in April, while its first Mars rover, Zhurong, landed in May, making it the only second country to achieve such a feat.

“For the past 20 years, since China finally decided to go into space, it’s been in catch-up mode,” McDowall said. “And now they’re kind of over there, and they’re starting to do things that the United States hasn’t done.”

The United Arab Emirates placed a probe in Mars orbit in February, becoming the first Arab nation and the fifth overall to reach the planet.

Meanwhile, Russia launched a missile at one of its own satellites, becoming the fourth country to strike a spacecraft from the ground, reigniting concerns about the growing space arms race.

Washington criticized Moscow for its “reckless” test, which generated more than 1,500 large pieces of orbital debris, dangerous for low Earth orbit missions such as the ISS.

Future…

The year ended with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, a US$10 billion marvel that will use infrared technology to travel back 13 billion years in time.

“It’s arguably the most expensive single science platform ever created,” said Casey Drier, lead attorney for the Planetary Society.

“To push the limits of our knowledge of the cosmos, we had to build something capable of accessing this ancient past,” he added.

It will reach Lagrange Point 2, a space landmark a million miles from Earth, in a few weeks, then start up and gradually calibrate its systems, coming online around June.

Also next year will see the launch of Artemis 1 – when NASA’s Giant Space Launch System (SLS) will carry the Orion capsule to the Moon and back, in preparation for America’s return with humans later this decade.

NASA plans to build lunar habitats and use lessons learned for advanced missions to Mars in the 2030s.

Observers are heartened that the agenda launched by former President Donald Trump has continued under Joe Biden — even if he hasn’t made his support as clear.

Finally, next fall, NASA’s DART probe will hit an asteroid to deflect it from its trajectory.

The proof-of-concept test is a dry run should humanity ever stop a giant space rock from wiping out life on Earth, as seen in Netflix’s new hit movie “Don’t Look Up.”

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A year of space tourism, flights to Mars, the rise of China » Capital News https://newtoncountymotourism.org/a-year-of-space-tourism-flights-to-mars-the-rise-of-china-capital-news/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/a-year-of-space-tourism-flights-to-mars-the-rise-of-china-capital-news/ Washington (AFP), December 30 – From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors. Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final […]]]>

Washington (AFP), December 30 – From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors.

Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew entered orbit, and Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth explanation of what it was like to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism was finally taking off. .

Here are the selected highlights.

– Red Planet robot duo –

Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth look at what it meant to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism finally came into its own © AFP/File/Patrick T. FALLON

NASA’s Perseverance Rover has survived its “seven minutes of terror”, a period when the craft relies on its automated systems for descent and landing, to land safely on Mars’ Jezero crater in February.

Since then, the car-sized robot has been taking pictures and drilling samples for its mission: to determine if the Red Planet may have harbored ancient microbial lifeforms.

A rock sample return mission is planned for the 2030s.

With its advanced instruments, “Percy”, as the helicopter is affectionately nicknamed, can also zap Martian rock and chemically analyze steam.

Percy has a partner for the ride: Ingenuity, a four-pound (two-kilogram) rotorcraft that achieved the first powered flight on another celestial body in April, just over a century after the Wright brothers achieved the same feat here on Earth. , and has played many more since.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

“Perseverance is kind of the flagship mission, it does a long-term detailed investigation of this fascinating region of Mars,” Jonathan McDowall, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told AFP.

In contrast, “Ingenuity is one of those cute, small, cheap little tech demos that NASA can do so well,” he added.

Knowledge gained from Ingenuity could help scientists develop Dragonfly, a planned thousand-pound drone helicopter, to search for signs of life on Saturn’s moon Titan in the mid-2030s.

– Private space flight takes off –

An American millionaire became the world’s first space tourist in 2001, but it took another 20 years for the promise of private spaceflight to finally materialize.

In July, Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson competed against Blue Origin’s Jeff Bezos to be the first non-professional astronaut to perform suborbital spaceflight.

While the British tycoon won that battle within days, it was Blue Origin that took the lead, launching three more flights with paying customers and celebrities.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX entered the fray in September with a three-day orbital mission around Earth with an all-civilian crew on Inspiration 4.

This NASA photo released on April 27, 2021 shows a black and white image taken by the navigation camera aboard NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter during its third flight to Mars on April 25, 2021 © NASA/AFP/File/Document

“It’s really exciting that finally, after so long, this stuff is finally happening,” said space industry analyst Laura Seward Forczyk, author of the forthcoming book “Becoming Off-Worldly,” intended to prepare future space travelers.

But it was William Shatner, who played the slick Captain Kirk in the 1960s “Star Trek” TV series, who stole the show with a moving account of his experience.

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“What you despise is Mother Earth, and she needs to be protected,” he told reporters.

A Russian crew shot the first feature film in space aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2021, and Japanese tourists took their own tour there aboard a Russian rocket.

For a few minutes on December 11, there were a record 19 humans in space when Blue Origin flew its third crewed mission, the Japanese team was on the ISS with their normal crew, and the Chinese taikonauts were in position on their station.

However, the sight of wealthy elites galloping through the cosmos did not please everyone, and the nascent space tourism industry sparked a backlash from some who said there were more problems. pressing issues to face, such as climate change, here on Earth.

– Globalization of space –

Students watch a live image of a lesson given by Chinese astronauts from China’s Tiangong space station at a school in Yantai, eastern China’s Shandong province © AFP/STR

During the Cold War, space was dominated by the United States and the former Soviet Union.

Now, in addition to the explosion of the commercial sector, which is sending out satellites at a dizzying rate, China, India and others are increasingly flexing their spaceflight muscles.

China’s Tiangong (palace in the sky) space station – its first long-term outpost – launched in April, while its first Mars rover, Zhurong, landed in May, making it the only second country to achieve such a feat.

“For the past 20 years, since China finally decided to go big in space, it’s been in catch-up mode,” McDowall said. “And now they’re kind of over there, and they’re starting to do things that the United States hasn’t done.”

The United Arab Emirates placed a probe in Mars orbit in February, becoming the first Arab nation and the fifth overall to reach the planet.

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Meanwhile, Russia launched a missile at one of its own satellites, becoming the fourth country to strike a spacecraft from the ground, reigniting concerns about the growing space arms race.

Washington criticized Moscow for its “reckless” test, which generated more than 1,500 large pieces of orbital debris, dangerous for low Earth orbit missions such as the ISS.

– Coming soon… –

Arianespace’s Ariane 5 rocket with NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope on board rises from the launch pad, at the European Spaceport, Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana, December 25, 2021 © AFP / jody amiet

The year ended with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, a $10 billion marvel that will use infrared technology to travel back 13 billion years in time.

“It’s arguably the most expensive single science platform ever created,” said Planetary Society lead advocate Casey Drier.

“To push the limits of our knowledge of the cosmos, we had to build something capable of accessing this ancient past,” he added.

It will reach Lagrange Point 2, a space landmark a million miles from Earth, in a few weeks, then start up and gradually calibrate its systems, coming online around June.

Also next year will see the launch of Artemis 1 – when NASA’s Giant Space Launch System (SLS) will carry the Orion capsule to the Moon and back, in preparation for America’s return with humans later this decade.

NASA plans to build lunar habitats and use lessons learned for advanced missions to Mars in the 2030s.

Observers are heartened that the agenda launched by former President Donald Trump has continued under Joe Biden – even if he hasn’t been as vocal in his support.

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Finally, next fall, NASA’s DART probe will hit an asteroid to deflect it from its trajectory.

The proof-of-concept test is a dry run should humanity ever stop a giant space rock from wiping out life on Earth, as seen in Netflix’s new hit movie “Don’t Look Up.”

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Russia ready to “fight” for the supremacy of space tourism https://newtoncountymotourism.org/russia-ready-to-fight-for-the-supremacy-of-space-tourism/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/russia-ready-to-fight-for-the-supremacy-of-space-tourism/ After a decade-long hiatus, Russia is relaunching an ambitious bid to dominate the burgeoning global space tourism industry, jostling with zealous billionaires, the United States and rising China. Russia flaunted its comeback this month by sending two cosmic adventurers – Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant – to the International Space Station (ISS) on […]]]>


After a decade-long hiatus, Russia is relaunching an ambitious bid to dominate the burgeoning global space tourism industry, jostling with zealous billionaires, the United States and rising China.

Russia flaunted its comeback this month by sending two cosmic adventurers – Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant – to the International Space Station (ISS) on its first tourist launch in 12 years.

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Building on this success, Firebrand space chief Dmitry Rogozin spoke about Russia’s next steps towards supremacy: a special module at the ISS for Russian visitors, spacewalks outside from the station and, later, trips around the moon.

“We will not give the Americans this slot. We are ready to fight for it,” he told reporters at a press conference as Maezawa headed to the ISS on a 12-day mission. .

Yet Russia’s path to industry dominance is fraught with new hurdles that have emerged since it last emerged ten years ago.

At the time, the Russian space agency Roscosmos had a monopoly on sending curious people into space. That changed when U.S. agency NASA pulled its own astronaut shuttle back in 2011 and reclaimed all of the ISS seats Roscosmos had to offer for the next decade.

Then, last year, billionaire Elon Musk’s SpaceX burst onto the scene with its first successful ISS mission and NASA jettisoned Roscosmos.

At a reported $ 90 million per seat, it was a financial blow to the cash-strapped Russian space agency, simultaneously hit by budget cuts and corruption scandals.

Analysts say Roscosmos has no choice but to look to tourism to fill the gap. “The Russian space industry depends on consistent orders for these launches,” industry analyst Vitaly Yegorov told AFP.

The price of a seat – estimated at between $ 50 million and $ 60 million – covers the cost of building the three-person Soyuz spacecraft to transport the crew, he said, while a second traveler makes a profit . But space tourism isn’t just about money, officials say.

“It’s a national prestige. Young people are interested in human spaceflight. It’s the future, after all,” said Dmitry Loskutov, director of Glavkosmos, a Roscosmos subsidiary responsible for commercial projects, including tourism.

Russia, China and the United States are the only countries capable of manned flight, but a multitude of newcomers are entering the scene and forcing Russia to step up its game, SpaceX among them.

Musk has yet to take any tourists to the ISS, but this year his Inspiration4 brought an all-civilian crew into Earth orbit for a three-day mission.

Amazon Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos and billionaire Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic are also eager to be cut. Their two spacecraft made their maiden voyage this year, remaining weightless for several minutes before returning to Earth.

But Andrei Ionin of the Russian Academy of Cosmonautics says you just can’t compare billionaires’ brief low-orbit flights to a multi-day mission to the ISS. “It’s like comparing Ferrari and the Renault market,” he said.

Loskutov echoed this point, saying that travel is more of the “entertainment industry” than space travel.

Still, Yegorov said, “the competition is increasing,” especially from SpaceX. Russia has taken note of this. He wants to expand his offerings, including a spacewalk on an upcoming tourism mission, Loskutov said.

Moscow also unveiled plans for its own orbital station with the ISS which is expected to retire within the next decade and Rogozin said there may be a “separate tourist module” on board.

He raised the possibility of new routes, for example by following the path of the first human in space, the Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin.

Rogozin also said that after 2030, Roscosmos hopes to offer a trip around the moon.

But that timeline lags far behind SpaceX’s ambitions – it has announced a mission to take eight people around the moon as early as 2023. Another complication Roscosmos faces in the industry is to assess and meet demand.

On the one hand, Soyuz spacecraft are expensive and a mission takes at least two years to organize.

Loskutov said Russia has pre-ordered a rocket for the next launch, and Rogozin has asked his agency to increase production of Soyuz.

Real demand – not just interest – is also difficult to assess. Applicants should be prepared to shell out, meet health requirements, and commit to months of training and a period of re-education after returning to Earth. “In my opinion, it isn’t crowded – but you don’t need a lot anyway,” Ionin said.

At least for now, he said, Russia is ahead thanks to the Soyuz designed and tested by the Soviets. “For the next five to ten years there is no threat to Roscosmos’ business,” Ionin added.


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Japanese tycoon arrives at ISS as Russia resumes space tourism https://newtoncountymotourism.org/japanese-tycoon-arrives-at-iss-as-russia-resumes-space-tourism/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/japanese-tycoon-arrives-at-iss-as-russia-resumes-space-tourism/ Baikonur, Kazakhstan – A Japanese billionaire arrived at the International Space Station on Wednesday, marking Russia’s return to space tourism after a decade-long hiatus that saw rising competition from the United States. Online fashion mogul Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant Yozo Hirano took off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan earlier on Wednesday. They docked […]]]>

A Japanese billionaire arrived at the International Space Station on Wednesday, marking Russia’s return to space tourism after a decade-long hiatus that saw rising competition from the United States.

Online fashion mogul Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant Yozo Hirano took off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan earlier on Wednesday.

They docked with the Poisk module of the Russian segment of the ISS at 1340 GMT, the Russian space agency said.

A live feed from Roscosmos showed the hatch of the Soyuz MS-20 capsule opened at 4:11 p.m. GMT, showing Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin entering the ISS, followed by Maezawa and Hirano, the first private Japanese citizens to visit the space from the journey of journalist Toyohiro Akiyama. to the Mir space station in 1990.

Their trip aboard the three-person Soyuz spacecraft piloted by cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin lasted just over six hours, capping a banner year that many have seen as a turning point for private space travel.

On launch day, Maezawa and his crew left their hotel in Baikonur to a Soviet-era song played for all cosmonauts before their flights. The song, about cosmonauts missing at home, was sung partially in Japanese.

Maezawa’s family and friends – some holding Japanese flags – waved him off as he was driven away to have his spacesuit adjusted.

“Dream comes true,” the mogul tweeted Wednesday morning.

Fellow billionaires Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson have all made groundbreaking commercial tourist flights this year, entering a market Russia is keen to defend.

The trio will spend 12 days on the station. Japanese tourists plan to document their daily life aboard the space station to share on Maezawa’s popular YouTube channel.

The 46-year-old billionaire has set out 100 tasks to complete on board, including organizing a badminton tournament in orbit.

The space station is home to an international crew of seven, including two Russian cosmonauts and a Japanese astronaut.

Maezawa, who is a space enthusiast, also plans to take eight people with him on a 2023 mission around Musk’s SpaceX-operated moon.

Before its layoff, Russia used to take self-funded tourists into space.

In partnership with the American company Space Adventures, the space agency Roscosmos has taken eight tourists to the space station since 2001, including one twice.

The last was Canadian Cirque du Soleil co-founder Guy Laliberté in 2009, who became the first clown in space. In October, Russia launched its first untrained cosmonauts into space since that trip, bringing a Russian actress and director to the space station where they filmed scenes for the first movie in orbit.

Moscow had stopped sending tourists into space after NASA retired the space shuttle in 2011, leaving Russia with a monopoly on supplying the space station.

NASA purchased all Soyuz launch seats for $90 million per seat, effectively ending tourist flights.

But that all changed last year when a SpaceX spacecraft successfully delivered its first astronauts to the space station.

NASA began buying flights from SpaceX, stripping Russia of its monopoly and costing its cash-strapped space agency millions of dollars in revenue.

Although the cost of space tickets for tourists has not been disclosed, Space Adventures said it is between $50 million and $60 million.

Roscosmos said it plans to continue expanding its space tourism business, already ordering two Soyuz rockets for such trips.

The agency also announces a spacewalk to be performed by a tourist during a trip to a space station in 2023.

But Roscosmos also faces competition from SpaceX in space tourism.

Earlier this year, a Crew Dragon capsule flew an all-civilian mission on a three-day trip around Earth orbit in a historic first.

Also hot on the heels of Russia are Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin and billionaire Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic, which completed their first tourist trip this year.

Although the flights of these companies do not go into orbit, they offer several minutes of weightlessness without requiring months of training and at a significantly lower cost.

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The end of mass tourism https://newtoncountymotourism.org/the-end-of-mass-tourism/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 05:01:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/the-end-of-mass-tourism/ In addition to the usual requests for car rentals and hotel reservations, European low-cost airline Ryanair is now offering customers the option of paying carbon offsets when booking online. For those unfamiliar with the term, a carbon offset is meant to offset the fossil fuel emissions from your trip, a kind of eco-indulgence for the […]]]>


In addition to the usual requests for car rentals and hotel reservations, European low-cost airline Ryanair is now offering customers the option of paying carbon offsets when booking online. For those unfamiliar with the term, a carbon offset is meant to offset the fossil fuel emissions from your trip, a kind of eco-indulgence for the environmentally conscious. You can select your compensation right after downloading your mandatory Covid documentation, which includes, depending on your country of origin, a vaccination passport, a negative Covid test, and an official registration of your home address and where you will be staying. .

It is not difficult to see where this is going. The second half of the 20e century was not only a time of mass abundance, but a time of mass tourism. At least in the developed world, middle and working class families have become accustomed to recreational travel. Now, however, the economic system that gave us the motel, campground, and annual summer vacation is fading just as new barriers to international tourism, from Covid restrictions to environmentalism, have emerged. .

At the end of the 19e and early 20e for centuries the archetype of the foreign tourist was a sophisticated wealthy, often British, perhaps with an amateur interest in painting or architecture or travel writing. Wealthy Americans would embark on major European tours, a formative experience for young Theodore Roosevelt, whose wealthy family could afford the expense of extended continental vacations.

The post-war boom changed everything. Peace, paid vacations, the automobile, and decades of post-war growth in the United States and Europe created a new class of budget vacationers, who in turn spurred the creation of travel agencies. travel, charter buses, motels and guesthouses, and other services to facilitate middle-class tourism. Exotic destinations like the French Riviera, the Amalfi Coast and Saint-Tropez suddenly gained an international reputation, aided and encouraged by mass media and popular films.

In 1960, most Western Europeans had two weeks of paid vacation. In the early 1950s, according to historian Tony Judt, French tourists in Spain numbered thousands. In 1964, 7 million people visiting every summer. In the early 1970s, more than 6 million tourists visited Western Europe every year the Yugoslav coast. The American middle class has experienced a boom similar trips.

From “tourist traps” to family vacation packages to stereotypes of loud Americans, photo-crazed Japanese and pastry Britons making their seasonal migration to sunny Spain, generations of travelers have lived through this era of travel. abroad. But can a pre-pandemic system built on widely shared prosperity and stupendous consumption of fossil fuels survive into the mid-21 decades?st century?

Navigating a world of virtual restaurant menus, electronic vaccine passports, and mandatory document downloads will almost certainly prove to be overwhelming for older travelers. The increased vulnerability of older people to Covid may also dampen their enthusiasm for vacations abroad, even after the threat of the disease has receded.

Young people and tech-savvy people are likely to find this new environment more welcoming, but if carbon offsets, health-related flight cancellations, and negative antigen testing become standard operating procedure, air travel will soon become prohibitive for people. most of them. And while young people are more comfortable breaking through electronic barriers, the digital life can undermine their desire for international adventure. Gory video games seem to have reduced our appetite for violence and pornography almost certainly reduced our appetite for sex. Social media platforms like Instagram could do something similar to travel.

Airlines and the tourism industry are not about to disappear, but their business models and customer profiles will begin to conform to new economic realities. Tourism will return to its roots as a luxury good, and for those who can afford carbon indulgences and enough upgrades to avoid invasive health and safety checks, travel will become an extravaganza instead of a annual ritual of the middle class.

Already, the travel industry seems to be moving in this direction. Family packages and economy class plane tickets are out; ecotourism, charming hotels and personalized services like Airbnb are there. In the United States, travel to national parks during the pandemic era exploded as European countries like Hungary and Italy launched campaigns to promote sightseeing within their own borders. Domestic tourism and “stays” become consolation prizes for those who cannot afford to go abroad.

International tourism may rebound quickly after the pandemic has receded, but the rigidity of the post-9/11 security theater sets a suggestive precedent. The relatively minor threat of a spectacular terrorist attack has given us 20 years of mandatory airport shoe inspections, TSA pat-downs, and endless security lines. A disease on the verge of becoming endemic, and with a far wider impact than the attacks of September 11, will it quickly disappear from public consciousness? A more likely outcome is the permanent addition of health protocols to our routine security checks, to be avoided by those savvy and affluent enough to pay for various officially sanctioned shortcuts (a Covid version of TSA’s CLEAR program, which allows travelers to pay to bypass security by downloading personal biometric data, seems inevitable).

Carbon offsets and other environmental restrictions are not yet mandatory, but elite consensus is rapidly evolving in the direction of restricting air travel.Flygskam—Swedish for “flight blur” —was shorthand for feeling guilty about traveling by plane. Popular travel sites help environmentally conscious consumers find alternatives to theft. An Explanator of the Green New Deal Posted on the progressive sweetheart’s website, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says the program aims to make air travel “unnecessary.” A report from the World Economic Forum on eco-friendly air travel carefully points out that there is a ‘cost difference’ between old-fashioned jet fuel and sustainable alternatives, but remains silent on who will bear that cost when airlines switch at the Green light. The likely answer is that travelers will pay in the form of“Green flight functions” a solution that has already been proposed in the UK The World Economic Forum report helpfully notes that “corporate flyers” have shown a willingness to pay extra for environmentally friendly transport.

This last aside is revealing. Those most likely to travel in the future (wealthy, young, educated, environmentally conscious and probably business-minded) are also more likely to accept new environmental and health restrictions and incur new travel costs. The older and poorer will be left behind, literally and figuratively, as the idea of ​​an annual beach vacation abroad becomes a distant memory.

Changes within the travel industry are lagging indicators of broader economic and cultural changes in Western society. According to the Brookings Institution, America’s middle class has shrunk dramatically over the past few decades while the upper middle class has grown. The tastes and prejudices of upper-middle-class consumers, who already exert a disproportionate influence as creators of cultural tastes and custodians of elite institutions, are now reshaping tourism. The result will be a travel industry that prioritizes environmental and public health concerns over affordability.

The EU smells badly among conservatives, but there was (was?) Something slightly miraculous about the Schengen zone, which allowed free movement of citizens in most member states before the pandemic. Some of Schengen’s most enthusiastic supporters believed it was a model for a global society without borders. Instead, it looks like the last breath of the era of mass tourism, a relic from an era before global pandemics, economic stagnation, environmental alarmism and the resurgence of nationalism.

What comes next can be more depressing than all the cheap motels and dingy campgrounds put together. On a recent trip to Italy, I came across a McDonalds at Milan Central Station hoping for a quick meal. I was greeted by a masked and gloved health inspector who checked the QR code on my vaccination card before giving me a red verification sticker. All orders were made through electronic kiosks; employees barely exchanged words with customers as they assembled and handed out Big Macs behind a huge plexiglass shield. Everyone wore masks and pretty much everyone was hunched over a phone while they waited for their orders. Many never bother to take off their wireless headphones. If this is the future of affordable travel, who will bother to pay for the tickets?

In a parallel universe, Mark Zuckerberg had just announced the rebranding of Facebook to “Meta”, with a cringe-worthy video of his new virtual reality platform. Coincidentally, the World Economic Forum recently suggested that virtual reality tourism could become a healthy and environmentally friendly alternative to real-world travel. The Zuckerbergs of the world aren’t about to give up their private jets, and the well-heeled employees of companies like Facebook – sorry, “Meta” – will almost certainly continue to vacation in exotic foreign destinations. For everyone else, the allure of digital life and the indignities of class travel steer clear of the 21st century will make mass tourism a thing of the past.

Will collins is a teacher in Budapest, Hungary.


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