tourism industry – Newton County MO Tourism http://newtoncountymotourism.org/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 13:27:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-57.png tourism industry – Newton County MO Tourism http://newtoncountymotourism.org/ 32 32 Laois Heritage receives €100,000 for conservation work https://newtoncountymotourism.org/laois-heritage-receives-e100000-for-conservation-work/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 13:27:57 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/laois-heritage-receives-e100000-for-conservation-work/ Historic buildings in Laois are set to receive a share of €96,000 for conservation work to help save the buildings for future generations. A total of 512 heritage projects across all counties across the country will receive €4 million in funding this year through the Built Heritage Investment Scheme (BHIS) administered by the Department of […]]]>

Historic buildings in Laois are set to receive a share of €96,000 for conservation work to help save the buildings for future generations.

A total of 512 heritage projects across all counties across the country will receive €4 million in funding this year through the Built Heritage Investment Scheme (BHIS) administered by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage.

  • The Laois buildings to benefit from it are as follows.
  • Emo Gate Lodge €12,500
  • O’Connell House, Mountmellick – €7,000
  • Lea Church, Killenard – €12,500
  • Preston House, Abbeyleix – €6,000
  • Portrane House, Stradbally – €5,000
  • St Paul’s Church (French Church), Portarlington – €7,000
  • Tenakill House, Portlaoise – €15,000
  • Vicarstown National School – €8,000

The thatched roof houses are:

  • Ballacolla – €6,900
  • Rath League – €6,900
  • Rosenalis – €8,750
  • Cullo Hill – €450

With grants of up to €15,000, BHIS helps owners of heritage structures – including those on the local authority’s Register of Protected Structures and those located in architectural conservation areas – to meet their obligations to care of their properties.

Funding can be used to undertake repair work, thereby contributing to the upkeep and maintenance of heritage structures. Examples include repairing roofs, walls and joinery, sealing windows, lime plaster and repairing stained glass.

Laois Offaly TD and Minister of State for the Department of Finance, Seán Fleming, said built heritage is one of the main attractions for visitors to Ireland. Its conservation also strengthens and promotes our tourism industry and contributes to the regeneration of urban and rural areas.

He added that it contributes to the vitality of our towns, villages and countryside, instils a sense of pride and improves the quality of our daily life.

“We have wonderful examples of heritage buildings in Laois and this funding, in addition to the conservation of these buildings, will provide employment for the many small businesses, skilled conservation specialists and artisans involved in heritage related building activities. “, did he declare.

The funding was welcomed by Green Party Minister of State Laois Offaly, Pippa Hackett.

“Laois has magnificent churches and old houses that deserve to be maintained and preserved.
“We also have a tradition of thatching, a skill we shouldn’t lose, so I’m particularly pleased to see that funding for thatched houses is included,” said Minister Hackett.

Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan TD.

“I am delighted to announce a €4 million investment in our built heritage through the Built Heritage Investment Program for 2022, which will support owners and caretakers of 512 historic and protected structures across the country. . The funding will make it possible to carry out conservation work on our built heritage, in order to help safeguard it for future generations.

“These awards will boost the economy in all 31 local authorities, providing jobs for small businesses, skilled conservationists and shopkeepers, ensuring a continued focus on traditional craftsmanship – all of which help us deliver Heritage Ireland. 2030, the new national heritage plan that I launched last month,” he said.

A statement added that the protection of our built heritage was one of the priorities of the recently published intergovernmental strategy for the protection of Irish heritage, Heritage Ireland 2030. In addition, partnership is a key theme of Heritage Ireland 2030, and the BHIS is one of two built heritage funding schemes, run in association with the 31 local authorities and their Architectural Conservation Officers and Heritage Officers, working in partnership with the Department to protect our built heritage.

He said another aspect of the 2022 program is the continuation of a stream of micro-grants introduced in 2020 to increase the resilience of historic structures to withstand the effects of climate change. This is claimed to allow local authorities to give smaller rewards to owners of historic properties for carrying out routine maintenance to offset the impact of climate change on their buildings.”

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Tourism leaders urge world governments to work urgently to protect the oceans https://newtoncountymotourism.org/tourism-leaders-urge-world-governments-to-work-urgently-to-protect-the-oceans/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 12:47:10 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/tourism-leaders-urge-world-governments-to-work-urgently-to-protect-the-oceans/ The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and France co-hosted a session entitled “Tourism in the blue economy”, attended by high-level representatives who agreed that the establishment of such an economy could combat the threats of climate change, plastic pollution and the overexploitation of resources. In a press release issued on February 11, the World Tourism […]]]>

The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and France co-hosted a session entitled “Tourism in the blue economy”, attended by high-level representatives who agreed that the establishment of such an economy could combat the threats of climate change, plastic pollution and the overexploitation of resources.

In a press release issued on February 11, the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) noted that during the meeting, the panel representing Colombia, Kenya, Seychelles and Palau, explained how sustainably would help create a more competitive and inclusive tourism sector, SchengenVisaInfo. com reports.

UNWTO Executive Director Zoritsa Urosevic told those present at the Summit that tourism is a key player in preserving the blue world through incentives and financial mechanisms.

But we can and must do more. As part of the recovery, tourism must play a key role in regenerating coastal and marine ecosystems for resilience, putting people at the center of our effortss,” Urosevic said.

In addition, according to the UNWTO, the resurgence of global tourism due to the impact of the pandemic represents an opportunity for the sector to accompany the transformation of coastal and maritime destinations into more sustainable and oriental models, stable in the protection of the oceans. .

The Seychelles Minister of Foreign Affairs and Tourism, Sylvestre Ragedonde, stressed that the blue economy represents an integrated approach to tourism and the local economic sector.

“The fates of tourism and the blue economy must be linked to make responsible use of limited resources. Our mother ocean should play a prominent role in tourism strategies,” he added in this regard.

In addition, business leaders from Accor, ClubMed, Costa Cruises, Iberostar Group, PONANT, TUI Group and the Blue Climate Initiative have joined the call for policy makers to focus on protecting oceans. They are also committed to tackling plastic pollution by aligning their policies with the framework of the Global Plastic Tourism Initiative, which supports the transition to a circular plastic economy.

Hervé Gastinel, CEO of PONANT, expressed his joy for the announced activity against the Global Plastic Tourism Initiative.

Like the polar exploration vessel Le Commandant Charcot, PONANT is deploying its “Single-use plastic” objective on all of its vessels“, he also noted.

The seminar was moderated by One Planet network manager, Jorge Laguna-Celis, and closed by Accor’s director of sustainable development, Brune Poirson, who spoke about the tourism community which is in the collective movement around the Global Tourism Plastics Initiative and the Glasgow Declaration on Climate Action in Tourism. .

One Planet Network Manager Jorge Laguna-Celis said he was very pleased to work with the One Ocean Summit to increase commitments from tourism businesses and governments.

“The tourism sector can be a vehicle for education and prevention of plastic pollution and a source of sustainable recovery from the pandemic and generation of decent incomes for millions of people”, he underlined.

According to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), tourism now accounts for around 40% of the blue economy, which constitutes a significant portion of the value of exports.

For nearly ten years, UNWTO and WTM have worked together to create such a high-level summit that focuses on the key challenges facing the travel and tourism industry.

During this year, the Summit will focus on the sustainable future of this sector and the important role that “green investments” play in achieving this objective.

According to National Geographic, marine pollution remains a growing problem today. Marine fertilizers that end up in the ocean include all manufactured products, most of which are plastic. The increase in algal bloom is due to the increase in the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus, which can be harmful to human life.

Thus, the negative health effects caused by algal blooms harm the local fishing and tourism industry. Garbage, storms and poor waste management contribute to the accumulation of this waste, approximately 80% of which comes from the ground.

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BYATA – Working Holiday Visa Hard work finally pays off! https://newtoncountymotourism.org/byata-working-holiday-visa-hard-work-finally-pays-off/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 22:29:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/byata-working-holiday-visa-hard-work-finally-pays-off/ Wednesday, February 9, 2022, 11:29 a.m.Press release: Association of Young Backpackers and Adventure Tourism The Backpacker Youth and Adventure Travel Association (BYATA) is delighted to see that the association’s hard work and lobbying of senior government officials is finally paying off with the recent announcements regarding the easing of border restrictions, in particular those traveling […]]]>

The Backpacker Youth and Adventure Travel Association (BYATA) is delighted to see that the association’s hard work and lobbying of senior government officials is finally paying off with the recent announcements regarding the easing of border restrictions, in particular those traveling on working holidays and internationally. student visas.

Stage 1 of the 5-point plan begins on February 27, allowing fully vaccinated New Zealanders to return home and self-isolate, skipping the MIQ.

Stage 2, starting at 11:59am on March 13, enables the restart of our popular Working Holiday Visa (WHV) program, which will allow much-needed fully vaccinated young people around the world to experience Aotearoa without the requirements of the MIQ. New Zealand has long been popular with young people to live, work and play and restarting our WHVs will not only be a much needed boost to our tourism sector but will also provide much needed labor for our businesses. local, especially in the station. cities of Queenstown and Rotorua, where they battled COVID to attract Kiwis to work. A successful WHV program is essential to the survival of our sector and the tourism industry. BYATA thanks the support it has received from industry partners Tourism Industry Aotearoa (TIA) and Tourism Export Council New Zealand (TECNZ) in advocating for the rapid return of this fantastic program.

We thank the government for recognizing the importance of the working holiday visa and for acting now to open visa processing from March 14, 2022. With Australia announcing plans to open in February, we are really in a battle for youth market share and we need to work hard with our partners to be competitive in the youth travel space.

We didn’t expect Australia to be open so quickly for double-vaccinated travelers with limited self-isolation requirements, which is a problem for us as New Zealand is considered a double-vaccinated travel destination with Australia.

We will continue to fight to be on equal footing with Australia around our own self-isolation requirements, which is prohibitively expensive for international visitors traveling to New Zealand, especially compared to our neighbors in the pit.

BYATA is also delighted to see the government announce that from April, up to 5,000 international students will be able to complete apprenticeship programs in our unique New Zealand environment. BYATA supports Education NZ’s position that this is a good start towards recovery, but BYATA is happy to see this process starting again, and we will no doubt see these numbers increase over time.

These recent border announcements are a testament to the hard work BYATA’s advocacy team has put in over the past two years. The Prime Minister, in her comments to the media, reflected on the many benefits that young travelers bring to New Zealand, echoing the message that BYATA has put forward over several months of lobbying.

BYATA supports calls from the wider tourism industry to completely end self-isolation and MIQ requirements, at the same time we also support a phased approach, to ensure that the health and well-being of general public in New Zealand and that a sudden influx of visitors does not overwhelm our healthcare system. The border announcements are good news in what have been a few dark years for tourism. BYATA and its members look forward to the time when we will be able to once again extend our famous manaakitanga to our young visitors around the world.

About Backpacker Youth and Adventure Tourism Association – BYATA
BYATA is a not-for-profit association acting as the independent voice of the backpacking and adventure tourism industry in New Zealand. With a growing membership base of over 130 members nationwide, BYATA advocates on behalf of our members with relevant stakeholders including Tourism New Zealand, Immigration, Hospitality New Zealand, and more. BYAYA enables our members to make informed business decisions by sharing specific industry related data with our members. The New Zealand Hostel Association (NZHA) is a sub-group of BYATA and specializes in providing support and advocacy for New Zealand hostels. Visit the BYATA website for more information and follow us on LinkedIn and Facebook.

© Scoop Media

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10 Ways to Build Leadership Communities in a Hybrid Workplace https://newtoncountymotourism.org/10-ways-to-build-leadership-communities-in-a-hybrid-workplace/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 17:33:36 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/10-ways-to-build-leadership-communities-in-a-hybrid-workplace/ 10 travel destinations for post-pandemic life On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization officially classified the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic. The resulting travel bans decimated the tourism industry and international air travel initially plummeted as 98%. Almost two years later, travel is finally back on the table, although there are plenty of restrictions […]]]>

10 travel destinations for post-pandemic life

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization officially classified the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic. The resulting travel bans decimated the tourism industry and international air travel initially plummeted as 98%.

Almost two years later, travel is finally back on the table, although there are plenty of restrictions to consider. Anyway, an investigation in September 2021 found that as things returned to normal, 82% of Americans look forward to international travel more than anything else.

To inspire you for your next vacation (whatever it may be), this infographic lists the 10 most visited countries in 2019, along with three of their top attractions according to Google Maps.

have a nice trip

Here are the 10 most popular travel destinations in 2019, measured by their number of international arrivals.

Country Number of international arrivals in 2019 (millions)
🇬🇧France* 90.0
🇪🇸 Spain 83.5
🇺🇸 US 79.3
🇨🇳 China 65.7
🇮🇹 Italy 64.5
🇹🇷 Turkey 51.2
🇲🇽 Mexico 45.0
🇹🇭 Thailand 39.8
🇩🇪 Germany 39.6
🇬🇧 United Kingdom 39.4

*Estimate | Source: World Bank

France was the most popular travel destination by a significant margin, and it’s easy to see why. The country is home to many of the world’s most renowned sites, including the Triumphal arch and Louvre Museum.

The Arc de Triomphe was built in the early 1800s and honors those who died during the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars. In 1944, Allied soldiers marched through the monument after Paris was liberated from the Nazis.

The Louvre Museum, on the other hand, is often recognized by its giant glass pyramid. The museum houses more than 480,000 works of art, including Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.

Art isn’t the only thing France has to offer. The country has a reputation for culinary excellence and is home to 632 Michelin-starred restaurants, the most out of any country. Japan comes second, with 413.

While you’re there…

After visiting Paris, you might want to consider a visit to Spain. The country is France’s southern neighbor and is known for its beautiful villages and beaches.

One of its most impressive sites is the Sagrada Familia, a massive 440,000 square foot church that began construction in 1882 and is still being built today (139 years old). The video below shows the striking evolution of the structure.

At a height of 172 meters, the Sagrada Familia is approximately 52 stories tall.

Another popular place is Ibiza, an island off the coast of Spain famous for its vibrant nightlife. The island is frequently mentioned in pop culture – Netflix released an adventure/romance film titled Ibiza in 2018, and the remix of the song by Mike Posner I took a pill in Ibiza has over 1.4 billion views on YouTube.

Beaches galore

If you’re looking for something outside of Europe, consider Mexico or Thailand, which are the 7th and 8th most popular travel destinations. Both offer warm weather and an abundance of white sand beaches.

If you need even more convictions, check out these links:

Expect turbulence

Under normal circumstances, hundreds of billions of dollars are spent by international tourists every year. According to the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTCC), these expenses represented an impressive amount 10.4% of global GDP in 2019.

Travel restrictions introduced in 2020 have dealt a blow to the industry, reducing its share of global GDP to 5.5%, and annihilating an estimate 62 million works. While the WTCC believes those jobs could return by 2022, the emerging Omicron variant has already prompted many countries to tighten restrictions again.

To avoid headaches in the future, make sure you understand the rules and restrictions of where you’re going.

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2021: a year of space tourism, the rise of China https://newtoncountymotourism.org/2021-a-year-of-space-tourism-the-rise-of-china/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/2021-a-year-of-space-tourism-the-rise-of-china/ From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors. Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew […]]]>

From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors.

Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew entered orbit, and Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth explanation of what it was like to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism was finally taking off. .
Here are the selected highlights.

Red Planet Robot Duo

NASA’s Perseverance Rover has survived its “seven minutes of terror”, a period when the craft relies on its automated systems for descent and landing, to land safely on Mars’ Jezero crater in February.

Since then, the car-sized robot has been taking pictures and drilling samples for its mission: to determine if the Red Planet may have harbored ancient microbial lifeforms.

A rock sample return mission is planned for some time in the 2030s.

With its advanced instruments, “Percy”, as the helicopter is affectionately nicknamed, can also zap Martian rock and chemically analyze steam.

Percy has a partner for the ride: Ingenuity, a four-pound (two-kilogram) rotorcraft that achieved the first powered flight on another celestial body in April, just over a century after the Wright brothers achieved the same feat here on Earth. , and has played many more since.

“Perseverance is kind of the flagship mission, it’s doing a detailed, long-term investigation of this fascinating region of Mars,” Jonathan McDowall, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told AFP.

In contrast, “Ingenuity is one of those cute, small, cheap little tech demos that NASA can do so well,” he added.

Knowledge gained from Ingenuity could help scientists develop Dragonfly, a planned thousand-pound drone helicopter, to search for signs of life on Saturn’s moon Titan in the mid-2030s.

Private space flight takes off

An American millionaire became the world’s first space tourist in 2001, but it took another 20 years for the promise of private spaceflight to finally materialize.

In July, Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson competed against Blue Origin’s Jeff Bezos to be the first non-professional astronaut to perform suborbital spaceflight.

While the British tycoon won that battle within days, it was Blue Origin that took the lead, launching three more flights with paying customers and celebrities.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX entered the fray in September with a three-day orbital mission around Earth with an all-civilian crew on Inspiration 4.

“It’s really exciting that finally, after so long, this stuff is finally happening,” said space industry analyst Laura Seward Forczyk, author of the forthcoming book “Becoming Off-Worldly,” intended to prepare future space travelers.

But it was William Shatner, who played the swordsman Captain Kirk in the 1960s TV series “Star Trek,” who stole the show with a moving account of his experience.

“What you despise is Mother Earth, and she needs to be protected,” he told reporters.

A Russian crew shot the first feature film in space aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2021, and Japanese tourists took their own tour there aboard a Russian rocket.

For a few minutes on December 11, there were a record 19 humans in space when Blue Origin flew its third crewed mission, the Japanese team was on the ISS with their normal crew, and the Chinese taikonauts were in position on their station.

However, the sight of wealthy elites galloping through the cosmos did not please everyone, and the nascent space tourism industry sparked a backlash from some who said there were more problems. pressing issues to face, such as climate change, here on Earth.

Globalization of space

During the Cold War, space was dominated by the United States and the former Soviet Union.

Now, in addition to the explosion of the commercial sector, which is sending out satellites at a dizzying rate, China, India and others are increasingly flexing their spaceflight muscles.

China’s Tiangong (Palace in the Sky) space station – its first long-term outpost – launched in April, while its first Mars rover, Zhurong, landed in May, making it the only second country to achieve such a feat.

“For the past 20 years, since China finally decided to go into space, it’s been in catch-up mode,” McDowall said. “And now they’re kind of over there, and they’re starting to do things that the United States hasn’t done.”

The United Arab Emirates placed a probe in Mars orbit in February, becoming the first Arab nation and the fifth overall to reach the planet.

Meanwhile, Russia launched a missile at one of its own satellites, becoming the fourth country to strike a spacecraft from the ground, reigniting concerns about the growing space arms race.

Washington criticized Moscow for its “reckless” test, which generated more than 1,500 large pieces of orbital debris, dangerous for low Earth orbit missions such as the ISS.

Future…

The year ended with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, a US$10 billion marvel that will use infrared technology to travel back 13 billion years in time.

“It’s arguably the most expensive single science platform ever created,” said Casey Drier, lead attorney for the Planetary Society.

“To push the limits of our knowledge of the cosmos, we had to build something capable of accessing this ancient past,” he added.

It will reach Lagrange Point 2, a space landmark a million miles from Earth, in a few weeks, then start up and gradually calibrate its systems, coming online around June.

Also next year will see the launch of Artemis 1 – when NASA’s Giant Space Launch System (SLS) will carry the Orion capsule to the Moon and back, in preparation for America’s return with humans later this decade.

NASA plans to build lunar habitats and use lessons learned for advanced missions to Mars in the 2030s.

Observers are heartened that the agenda launched by former President Donald Trump has continued under Joe Biden — even if he hasn’t made his support as clear.

Finally, next fall, NASA’s DART probe will hit an asteroid to deflect it from its trajectory.

The proof-of-concept test is a dry run should humanity ever stop a giant space rock from wiping out life on Earth, as seen in Netflix’s new hit movie “Don’t Look Up.”

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A year of space tourism, flights to Mars, the rise of China » Capital News https://newtoncountymotourism.org/a-year-of-space-tourism-flights-to-mars-the-rise-of-china-capital-news/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/a-year-of-space-tourism-flights-to-mars-the-rise-of-china-capital-news/ Washington (AFP), December 30 – From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors. Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final […]]]>

Washington (AFP), December 30 – From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors.

Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew entered orbit, and Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth explanation of what it was like to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism was finally taking off. .

Here are the selected highlights.

– Red Planet robot duo –

Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth look at what it meant to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism finally came into its own © AFP/File/Patrick T. FALLON

NASA’s Perseverance Rover has survived its “seven minutes of terror”, a period when the craft relies on its automated systems for descent and landing, to land safely on Mars’ Jezero crater in February.

Since then, the car-sized robot has been taking pictures and drilling samples for its mission: to determine if the Red Planet may have harbored ancient microbial lifeforms.

A rock sample return mission is planned for the 2030s.

With its advanced instruments, “Percy”, as the helicopter is affectionately nicknamed, can also zap Martian rock and chemically analyze steam.

Percy has a partner for the ride: Ingenuity, a four-pound (two-kilogram) rotorcraft that achieved the first powered flight on another celestial body in April, just over a century after the Wright brothers achieved the same feat here on Earth. , and has played many more since.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

“Perseverance is kind of the flagship mission, it does a long-term detailed investigation of this fascinating region of Mars,” Jonathan McDowall, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told AFP.

In contrast, “Ingenuity is one of those cute, small, cheap little tech demos that NASA can do so well,” he added.

Knowledge gained from Ingenuity could help scientists develop Dragonfly, a planned thousand-pound drone helicopter, to search for signs of life on Saturn’s moon Titan in the mid-2030s.

– Private space flight takes off –

An American millionaire became the world’s first space tourist in 2001, but it took another 20 years for the promise of private spaceflight to finally materialize.

In July, Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson competed against Blue Origin’s Jeff Bezos to be the first non-professional astronaut to perform suborbital spaceflight.

While the British tycoon won that battle within days, it was Blue Origin that took the lead, launching three more flights with paying customers and celebrities.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX entered the fray in September with a three-day orbital mission around Earth with an all-civilian crew on Inspiration 4.

This NASA photo released on April 27, 2021 shows a black and white image taken by the navigation camera aboard NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter during its third flight to Mars on April 25, 2021 © NASA/AFP/File/Document

“It’s really exciting that finally, after so long, this stuff is finally happening,” said space industry analyst Laura Seward Forczyk, author of the forthcoming book “Becoming Off-Worldly,” intended to prepare future space travelers.

But it was William Shatner, who played the slick Captain Kirk in the 1960s “Star Trek” TV series, who stole the show with a moving account of his experience.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

“What you despise is Mother Earth, and she needs to be protected,” he told reporters.

A Russian crew shot the first feature film in space aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2021, and Japanese tourists took their own tour there aboard a Russian rocket.

For a few minutes on December 11, there were a record 19 humans in space when Blue Origin flew its third crewed mission, the Japanese team was on the ISS with their normal crew, and the Chinese taikonauts were in position on their station.

However, the sight of wealthy elites galloping through the cosmos did not please everyone, and the nascent space tourism industry sparked a backlash from some who said there were more problems. pressing issues to face, such as climate change, here on Earth.

– Globalization of space –

Students watch a live image of a lesson given by Chinese astronauts from China’s Tiangong space station at a school in Yantai, eastern China’s Shandong province © AFP/STR

During the Cold War, space was dominated by the United States and the former Soviet Union.

Now, in addition to the explosion of the commercial sector, which is sending out satellites at a dizzying rate, China, India and others are increasingly flexing their spaceflight muscles.

China’s Tiangong (palace in the sky) space station – its first long-term outpost – launched in April, while its first Mars rover, Zhurong, landed in May, making it the only second country to achieve such a feat.

“For the past 20 years, since China finally decided to go big in space, it’s been in catch-up mode,” McDowall said. “And now they’re kind of over there, and they’re starting to do things that the United States hasn’t done.”

The United Arab Emirates placed a probe in Mars orbit in February, becoming the first Arab nation and the fifth overall to reach the planet.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

Meanwhile, Russia launched a missile at one of its own satellites, becoming the fourth country to strike a spacecraft from the ground, reigniting concerns about the growing space arms race.

Washington criticized Moscow for its “reckless” test, which generated more than 1,500 large pieces of orbital debris, dangerous for low Earth orbit missions such as the ISS.

– Coming soon… –

Arianespace’s Ariane 5 rocket with NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope on board rises from the launch pad, at the European Spaceport, Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana, December 25, 2021 © AFP / jody amiet

The year ended with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, a $10 billion marvel that will use infrared technology to travel back 13 billion years in time.

“It’s arguably the most expensive single science platform ever created,” said Planetary Society lead advocate Casey Drier.

“To push the limits of our knowledge of the cosmos, we had to build something capable of accessing this ancient past,” he added.

It will reach Lagrange Point 2, a space landmark a million miles from Earth, in a few weeks, then start up and gradually calibrate its systems, coming online around June.

Also next year will see the launch of Artemis 1 – when NASA’s Giant Space Launch System (SLS) will carry the Orion capsule to the Moon and back, in preparation for America’s return with humans later this decade.

NASA plans to build lunar habitats and use lessons learned for advanced missions to Mars in the 2030s.

Observers are heartened that the agenda launched by former President Donald Trump has continued under Joe Biden – even if he hasn’t been as vocal in his support.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

Finally, next fall, NASA’s DART probe will hit an asteroid to deflect it from its trajectory.

The proof-of-concept test is a dry run should humanity ever stop a giant space rock from wiping out life on Earth, as seen in Netflix’s new hit movie “Don’t Look Up.”

]]>
Russia ready to “fight” for the supremacy of space tourism https://newtoncountymotourism.org/russia-ready-to-fight-for-the-supremacy-of-space-tourism/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/russia-ready-to-fight-for-the-supremacy-of-space-tourism/ After a decade-long hiatus, Russia is relaunching an ambitious bid to dominate the burgeoning global space tourism industry, jostling with zealous billionaires, the United States and rising China. Russia flaunted its comeback this month by sending two cosmic adventurers – Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant – to the International Space Station (ISS) on […]]]>


After a decade-long hiatus, Russia is relaunching an ambitious bid to dominate the burgeoning global space tourism industry, jostling with zealous billionaires, the United States and rising China.

Russia flaunted its comeback this month by sending two cosmic adventurers – Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant – to the International Space Station (ISS) on its first tourist launch in 12 years.

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Building on this success, Firebrand space chief Dmitry Rogozin spoke about Russia’s next steps towards supremacy: a special module at the ISS for Russian visitors, spacewalks outside from the station and, later, trips around the moon.

“We will not give the Americans this slot. We are ready to fight for it,” he told reporters at a press conference as Maezawa headed to the ISS on a 12-day mission. .

Yet Russia’s path to industry dominance is fraught with new hurdles that have emerged since it last emerged ten years ago.

At the time, the Russian space agency Roscosmos had a monopoly on sending curious people into space. That changed when U.S. agency NASA pulled its own astronaut shuttle back in 2011 and reclaimed all of the ISS seats Roscosmos had to offer for the next decade.

Then, last year, billionaire Elon Musk’s SpaceX burst onto the scene with its first successful ISS mission and NASA jettisoned Roscosmos.

At a reported $ 90 million per seat, it was a financial blow to the cash-strapped Russian space agency, simultaneously hit by budget cuts and corruption scandals.

Analysts say Roscosmos has no choice but to look to tourism to fill the gap. “The Russian space industry depends on consistent orders for these launches,” industry analyst Vitaly Yegorov told AFP.

The price of a seat – estimated at between $ 50 million and $ 60 million – covers the cost of building the three-person Soyuz spacecraft to transport the crew, he said, while a second traveler makes a profit . But space tourism isn’t just about money, officials say.

“It’s a national prestige. Young people are interested in human spaceflight. It’s the future, after all,” said Dmitry Loskutov, director of Glavkosmos, a Roscosmos subsidiary responsible for commercial projects, including tourism.

Russia, China and the United States are the only countries capable of manned flight, but a multitude of newcomers are entering the scene and forcing Russia to step up its game, SpaceX among them.

Musk has yet to take any tourists to the ISS, but this year his Inspiration4 brought an all-civilian crew into Earth orbit for a three-day mission.

Amazon Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos and billionaire Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic are also eager to be cut. Their two spacecraft made their maiden voyage this year, remaining weightless for several minutes before returning to Earth.

But Andrei Ionin of the Russian Academy of Cosmonautics says you just can’t compare billionaires’ brief low-orbit flights to a multi-day mission to the ISS. “It’s like comparing Ferrari and the Renault market,” he said.

Loskutov echoed this point, saying that travel is more of the “entertainment industry” than space travel.

Still, Yegorov said, “the competition is increasing,” especially from SpaceX. Russia has taken note of this. He wants to expand his offerings, including a spacewalk on an upcoming tourism mission, Loskutov said.

Moscow also unveiled plans for its own orbital station with the ISS which is expected to retire within the next decade and Rogozin said there may be a “separate tourist module” on board.

He raised the possibility of new routes, for example by following the path of the first human in space, the Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin.

Rogozin also said that after 2030, Roscosmos hopes to offer a trip around the moon.

But that timeline lags far behind SpaceX’s ambitions – it has announced a mission to take eight people around the moon as early as 2023. Another complication Roscosmos faces in the industry is to assess and meet demand.

On the one hand, Soyuz spacecraft are expensive and a mission takes at least two years to organize.

Loskutov said Russia has pre-ordered a rocket for the next launch, and Rogozin has asked his agency to increase production of Soyuz.

Real demand – not just interest – is also difficult to assess. Applicants should be prepared to shell out, meet health requirements, and commit to months of training and a period of re-education after returning to Earth. “In my opinion, it isn’t crowded – but you don’t need a lot anyway,” Ionin said.

At least for now, he said, Russia is ahead thanks to the Soyuz designed and tested by the Soviets. “For the next five to ten years there is no threat to Roscosmos’ business,” Ionin added.


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The end of mass tourism https://newtoncountymotourism.org/the-end-of-mass-tourism/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 05:01:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/the-end-of-mass-tourism/ In addition to the usual requests for car rentals and hotel reservations, European low-cost airline Ryanair is now offering customers the option of paying carbon offsets when booking online. For those unfamiliar with the term, a carbon offset is meant to offset the fossil fuel emissions from your trip, a kind of eco-indulgence for the […]]]>


In addition to the usual requests for car rentals and hotel reservations, European low-cost airline Ryanair is now offering customers the option of paying carbon offsets when booking online. For those unfamiliar with the term, a carbon offset is meant to offset the fossil fuel emissions from your trip, a kind of eco-indulgence for the environmentally conscious. You can select your compensation right after downloading your mandatory Covid documentation, which includes, depending on your country of origin, a vaccination passport, a negative Covid test, and an official registration of your home address and where you will be staying. .

It is not difficult to see where this is going. The second half of the 20e century was not only a time of mass abundance, but a time of mass tourism. At least in the developed world, middle and working class families have become accustomed to recreational travel. Now, however, the economic system that gave us the motel, campground, and annual summer vacation is fading just as new barriers to international tourism, from Covid restrictions to environmentalism, have emerged. .

At the end of the 19e and early 20e for centuries the archetype of the foreign tourist was a sophisticated wealthy, often British, perhaps with an amateur interest in painting or architecture or travel writing. Wealthy Americans would embark on major European tours, a formative experience for young Theodore Roosevelt, whose wealthy family could afford the expense of extended continental vacations.

The post-war boom changed everything. Peace, paid vacations, the automobile, and decades of post-war growth in the United States and Europe created a new class of budget vacationers, who in turn spurred the creation of travel agencies. travel, charter buses, motels and guesthouses, and other services to facilitate middle-class tourism. Exotic destinations like the French Riviera, the Amalfi Coast and Saint-Tropez suddenly gained an international reputation, aided and encouraged by mass media and popular films.

In 1960, most Western Europeans had two weeks of paid vacation. In the early 1950s, according to historian Tony Judt, French tourists in Spain numbered thousands. In 1964, 7 million people visiting every summer. In the early 1970s, more than 6 million tourists visited Western Europe every year the Yugoslav coast. The American middle class has experienced a boom similar trips.

From “tourist traps” to family vacation packages to stereotypes of loud Americans, photo-crazed Japanese and pastry Britons making their seasonal migration to sunny Spain, generations of travelers have lived through this era of travel. abroad. But can a pre-pandemic system built on widely shared prosperity and stupendous consumption of fossil fuels survive into the mid-21 decades?st century?

Navigating a world of virtual restaurant menus, electronic vaccine passports, and mandatory document downloads will almost certainly prove to be overwhelming for older travelers. The increased vulnerability of older people to Covid may also dampen their enthusiasm for vacations abroad, even after the threat of the disease has receded.

Young people and tech-savvy people are likely to find this new environment more welcoming, but if carbon offsets, health-related flight cancellations, and negative antigen testing become standard operating procedure, air travel will soon become prohibitive for people. most of them. And while young people are more comfortable breaking through electronic barriers, the digital life can undermine their desire for international adventure. Gory video games seem to have reduced our appetite for violence and pornography almost certainly reduced our appetite for sex. Social media platforms like Instagram could do something similar to travel.

Airlines and the tourism industry are not about to disappear, but their business models and customer profiles will begin to conform to new economic realities. Tourism will return to its roots as a luxury good, and for those who can afford carbon indulgences and enough upgrades to avoid invasive health and safety checks, travel will become an extravaganza instead of a annual ritual of the middle class.

Already, the travel industry seems to be moving in this direction. Family packages and economy class plane tickets are out; ecotourism, charming hotels and personalized services like Airbnb are there. In the United States, travel to national parks during the pandemic era exploded as European countries like Hungary and Italy launched campaigns to promote sightseeing within their own borders. Domestic tourism and “stays” become consolation prizes for those who cannot afford to go abroad.

International tourism may rebound quickly after the pandemic has receded, but the rigidity of the post-9/11 security theater sets a suggestive precedent. The relatively minor threat of a spectacular terrorist attack has given us 20 years of mandatory airport shoe inspections, TSA pat-downs, and endless security lines. A disease on the verge of becoming endemic, and with a far wider impact than the attacks of September 11, will it quickly disappear from public consciousness? A more likely outcome is the permanent addition of health protocols to our routine security checks, to be avoided by those savvy and affluent enough to pay for various officially sanctioned shortcuts (a Covid version of TSA’s CLEAR program, which allows travelers to pay to bypass security by downloading personal biometric data, seems inevitable).

Carbon offsets and other environmental restrictions are not yet mandatory, but elite consensus is rapidly evolving in the direction of restricting air travel.Flygskam—Swedish for “flight blur” —was shorthand for feeling guilty about traveling by plane. Popular travel sites help environmentally conscious consumers find alternatives to theft. An Explanator of the Green New Deal Posted on the progressive sweetheart’s website, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says the program aims to make air travel “unnecessary.” A report from the World Economic Forum on eco-friendly air travel carefully points out that there is a ‘cost difference’ between old-fashioned jet fuel and sustainable alternatives, but remains silent on who will bear that cost when airlines switch at the Green light. The likely answer is that travelers will pay in the form of“Green flight functions” a solution that has already been proposed in the UK The World Economic Forum report helpfully notes that “corporate flyers” have shown a willingness to pay extra for environmentally friendly transport.

This last aside is revealing. Those most likely to travel in the future (wealthy, young, educated, environmentally conscious and probably business-minded) are also more likely to accept new environmental and health restrictions and incur new travel costs. The older and poorer will be left behind, literally and figuratively, as the idea of ​​an annual beach vacation abroad becomes a distant memory.

Changes within the travel industry are lagging indicators of broader economic and cultural changes in Western society. According to the Brookings Institution, America’s middle class has shrunk dramatically over the past few decades while the upper middle class has grown. The tastes and prejudices of upper-middle-class consumers, who already exert a disproportionate influence as creators of cultural tastes and custodians of elite institutions, are now reshaping tourism. The result will be a travel industry that prioritizes environmental and public health concerns over affordability.

The EU smells badly among conservatives, but there was (was?) Something slightly miraculous about the Schengen zone, which allowed free movement of citizens in most member states before the pandemic. Some of Schengen’s most enthusiastic supporters believed it was a model for a global society without borders. Instead, it looks like the last breath of the era of mass tourism, a relic from an era before global pandemics, economic stagnation, environmental alarmism and the resurgence of nationalism.

What comes next can be more depressing than all the cheap motels and dingy campgrounds put together. On a recent trip to Italy, I came across a McDonalds at Milan Central Station hoping for a quick meal. I was greeted by a masked and gloved health inspector who checked the QR code on my vaccination card before giving me a red verification sticker. All orders were made through electronic kiosks; employees barely exchanged words with customers as they assembled and handed out Big Macs behind a huge plexiglass shield. Everyone wore masks and pretty much everyone was hunched over a phone while they waited for their orders. Many never bother to take off their wireless headphones. If this is the future of affordable travel, who will bother to pay for the tickets?

In a parallel universe, Mark Zuckerberg had just announced the rebranding of Facebook to “Meta”, with a cringe-worthy video of his new virtual reality platform. Coincidentally, the World Economic Forum recently suggested that virtual reality tourism could become a healthy and environmentally friendly alternative to real-world travel. The Zuckerbergs of the world aren’t about to give up their private jets, and the well-heeled employees of companies like Facebook – sorry, “Meta” – will almost certainly continue to vacation in exotic foreign destinations. For everyone else, the allure of digital life and the indignities of class travel steer clear of the 21st century will make mass tourism a thing of the past.

Will collins is a teacher in Budapest, Hungary.


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Business Chamber to Launch Campaign to Live, Work and Play in Cowra | Cowra Guardian https://newtoncountymotourism.org/business-chamber-to-launch-campaign-to-live-work-and-play-in-cowra-cowra-guardian/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 20:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/business-chamber-to-launch-campaign-to-live-work-and-play-in-cowra-cowra-guardian/ The Cowra Business Chamber, with support from the Cowra Council, is set to launch a new advertising campaign to attract population, business and tourism growth to the county. “Live, Work, Play” is a $ 40,000 television campaign that will hit screens in mid-December for an initial six-month term and showcase the untapped potential of the […]]]>


The Cowra Business Chamber, with support from the Cowra Council, is set to launch a new advertising campaign to attract population, business and tourism growth to the county.

“Live, Work, Play” is a $ 40,000 television campaign that will hit screens in mid-December for an initial six-month term and showcase the untapped potential of the Cowra region.

The advertisements will focus on the county’s home environment, a diverse range of secure jobs across multiple industries, and the fun, relaxing and recreational activities available in the area.

To fund the campaign, $ 15,000 was pledged by the House, $ 5,000 was donated by local businesses, and Cowra Council voted to provide the additional $ 20,000 at its regular meeting on November 22.

Ian Docker of the Cowra Business Chamber said the campaign targets regions such as Wollongong, Newcastle and Canberra.

“Production of the ad has started and will hopefully be finished in early December and on TV screens in late December,” he said.

“The Chamber of Commerce is committed to this initiative.

Mr Docker said the Chamber had also contacted Cowra Tourism, following their successful “Get Chris to Cowra” campaign and will explore opportunities to extend the campaign into the next year.

“The current board of directors is changing the direction of the Chamber to be more proactive with the business community as a whole,” he said.

“This campaign will not only help attract tourism, but everything will encompass the city.”

Councilor Ruth Fagan said it was a good time for this kind of campaign.

“I am really delighted to see that the Chamber of Commerce is moving down this path to involve more businesses in order to encourage people to come to Cowra and develop a choice of lifestyle,” she said. declared.

“I think now is the perfect time to do it and I commend the chamber.”

Cr Smith said the collaboration between council, chamber and tourism has proven to be beneficial for many years.

“The Council has had a very positive working relationship for a long time with the Cowra Chamber of Commerce and with the tourism industry as well and I believe this is one of the reasons for the success of many projects that have been carried out in the county, ”he said.

“I think it’s an exciting thing, I think if we even get a few people to grab job opportunities to love here… it will be worth more than the money spent.”

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West Side Rag “How an Out of Work Tour Guide Created a Coffee Table Book About the” Streets “of New York https://newtoncountymotourism.org/west-side-rag-how-an-out-of-work-tour-guide-created-a-coffee-table-book-about-the-streets-of-new-york/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 22:20:56 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/west-side-rag-how-an-out-of-work-tour-guide-created-a-coffee-table-book-about-the-streets-of-new-york/ Posted on December 1, 2021 at 5:17 p.m. by Carol Tannenhauser The author in the “park” of Rancho Tequileria. By Peggy Taylor I love sidewalk cafes. So last year, when Covid closed indoor dining and Mayor de Blasio extended alfresco dining as part of the Open Restaurants program, I internally jumped for joy and hoped […]]]>


Posted on December 1, 2021 at 5:17 p.m. by Carol Tannenhauser

The author in the “park” of Rancho Tequileria.

By Peggy Taylor

I love sidewalk cafes. So last year, when Covid closed indoor dining and Mayor de Blasio extended alfresco dining as part of the Open Restaurants program, I internally jumped for joy and hoped that New York would become Paris-on-the-Hudson. After college, I had spent a decade shopping around Parisian cafes, so the idea that they could flourish here thrilled me endlessly. Yes, I knew it would come from a tragedy, but I couldn’t wait to see it happen.

As well as shutting down the restaurant industry, the pandemic devastated the tourism industry, so as a New York City tour guide specializing in Harlem Gospel and Jazz tours, I quickly found myself unemployed. Like many West Siders, I stayed close to home and only ventured out to shop and stroll through Central Park. Then, in June 2020, following the launch of Open Restaurants, I overcame my fear of public transportation and decided to explore the city and document our new outdoor dining scene. Did the City really allow restaurants to set up on sidewalks and roads? under the trees in the street and the scaffolding sheds; above hatches and manhole covers? A restaurant even ended up on the ground floor of a homeless shelter.

Nice Matin four months ago.

I decided to call these outdoor installations “streets”, as the media had started to call them (exact origin unknown). I had never had dinner before and would probably never have dinner again. I have mainly explored Manhattan, but have also been to the Bronx and Queens. I did it in summer, fall and winter, in heat, cold, snow and rain.

So what did I find? Deliciously animated streets as the restaurateurs offered us a dizzying spectacle of yurts, huts, bubbles, faux Swiss chalets and tents suspended from plastic chandeliers. Some streets were upscale and elegant, but many were run down and ugly. Critics described the horrors as “shacks,” “favellas” and “slums,” but New Yorkers still flocked to them, wondering why we didn’t always dine this way. Even the people who had fled to the Hamptons returned for a day of dining on the streets only to find out what was new. No need to drink beer in the dark saloons anymore. We were all outside now, eating and drinking in the light.

We were also eating and drinking closer to traffic than ever before. Incredibly, we found ourselves having dinner in streets inches from the sanitation trucks, concrete mixers, car carriers and semi-trailers roaring above our necks. “I can’t believe I’m so close to this fire engine that I can talk to the driver,” says a Nice Matin brunchist. Another sprang from how it all was European. “I have the impression of being in Paris!

The first iteration of Harvest Kitchen.

The second iteration of Harvest Kitchen

The third iteration of Harvest Kitchen.

One of the things that struck me was how often the streeterias have changed. Restaurateurs were constantly innovating, or, as one of them put it, “We threw stuff on the wall and we went with what stuck”. For example, at the start of the pandemic, the Harvest Kitchen on Columbus Avenue placed chairs and tables between bike paths and cars, “protected” only by candlesticks and yellow police tape. But soon this street was replaced by a tent with a three-sided wooden fence that also served as a planter. It later became what we see today with hardwood flooring, plastic curtains, and a balustrade overflowing with flowers.

Jean-Georges at 1 Central Park West made us dine in style with his comfortable winter ski cabins fitted with carpets, padded benches, portable heaters and air purifiers. Some have complained that these cabins were not alfresco dining, and I also questioned them at first, but when I saw their air purifier and wall and roof hatches that opened easily for l fresh air, I fell in love with them. After having dinner in one, I didn’t want to come home.

Café du Soleil.

Another neighborhood street, the Café du Soleil, at 104th and Broadway, enchanted me with its zipped plastic bubbles reserved only for families or people who knew each other.

Another of my favorites was Rancho Tequileria at the 95th and Amsterdam whose miniature pennants in bright red, gold and orange cheered me up. It was a much needed antidote to the all-black streeterias that were all too common. Their black barriers, their black chairs, their black tables, their black signage exasperated me. How to choose black for a beer garden? Wasn’t the pandemic depressing enough?

Il Violino’s Easter house.

Then there was the neighborhood hit, Il Violino, on Columbus and 69th, whose streets change with the seasons: Christmas Cottage (with tin soldiers and candy canes); Spring Cottage (tulips and wreaths of flowers); Easter Cottage (Mr. & Mrs. Rabbit, with Easter eggs and carrots.)

I had a ball to capture all of this.

But not everyone liked streetwear. Critics complained of being too loud; drivers complained about lost parking spaces; pedestrians have taken over the wasted space on the sidewalk. “It’s not Paris!” the others fumed. The diners in the open air, they said, would be accosted by the homeless, manhandled by the vagabonds; the streets would invite vandals, arsonists and rats and would be overrun with uncontrollable drivers. “How would you like a Lyft in your soup?” Growled a critic. A lot of these things have actually happened, but not to the extent that the City has to abandon the program.

Even today, a vocal minority demands the end of the program. They cite noise, dirt and rats as issues, but as one restaurateur retorted, “New York City had noise, dirt and rats before Covid. Recent surveys show that the majority of New Yorkers love streetwear, which is why many restaurants retain their bubbles, huts, and cabins even when indoor dining resumes. The Greens ‘ski chalets featured on the cover of my book are back this winter, as are Jean-Georges’ chalets. Bergdorf Goodman has announced that their sidewalk café, B&G on Fifth, will return next spring.

Given their popularity, streeterias are clearly here to stay, and our ongoing battle with the Delta variant and now Omicron will ensure their longevity. It will be fine with me.


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