jeff bezos – Newton County MO Tourism http://newtoncountymotourism.org/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 21:14:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-57.png jeff bezos – Newton County MO Tourism http://newtoncountymotourism.org/ 32 32 Why space tourism is about to explode https://newtoncountymotourism.org/why-space-tourism-is-about-to-explode/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 21:14:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/why-space-tourism-is-about-to-explode/ Commercial space companies like Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin and Elon Musk’s SpaceX are doubling their flights this year. And shows no signs of slowing down. Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin spaceflight company plans to double its commercial flights this year, with market rivals expected to follow, in anticipation of a space tourism boom for the elite. […]]]>

Commercial space companies like Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin and Elon Musk’s SpaceX are doubling their flights this year. And shows no signs of slowing down.

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin spaceflight company plans to double its commercial flights this year, with market rivals expected to follow, in anticipation of a space tourism boom for the elite. Private space exploration companies have been launching spacecraft for years and have even beaten government projects during this time. These private companies have been so successful that the International Space Station, which has been operational for more than two decades, is expected to be shut down before the end of this decade. Instead, NASA expects these private companies to offer more efficient options. This could be due to the revenue these companies can generate through space tourism missions.

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Originally a concept reserved for cinema screens, space tourism for civilians is accessible to the wealthy. Blue Origin’s first spaceflight was a success and the winning bid sold for a whopping $28 million. The price rose from $4.8 million to $28 million in just over six minutes, demonstrating the demand for space tourism experiences and the willingness of the wealthy and wealthy to shell out the high prices they need. Virgin Galactic is mass space tourism or at least more affordable than its competitors. The company was selling space tickets for “just” $450,000 per seat and had a long waiting list of people willing to accept the offer.


Related: NASA Wants Robots to Build Moonbase for $200 Million

A report of Space News confirmed that Blue Origin plans to expand its commercial space missions, citing significant demand. “The market is robust, it is very robust“said Blue Origin CEO Bob Smith at the FAA’s 24th Annual Commercial Space Transportation Conference.”The challenge for Blue at this point is that we are actually limited by supplyWhile many people are willing to pay for flights to space, tourism companies are limited in the number of spacecraft that can be built. are needed to get these flights off the ground.


Blue Origin develops new vehicles for space tourism


To successfully increase the number of space missions per year, the company is looking to develop reusable launch systems. However, Blue Origin is aware that while reusable launch systems would mark the heart of the space tourism boom – it would increase the number of missions and reduce operating costs – it must be done safely. “This is the one we need to think about because this is where spaceflight got into trouble“Smith said.”We spent a lot of time thinking about how to methodically test a reusable launch system.“With a new spacecraft in the works and reusable launch technologies looming, the number of space tourism missions could double.


Other companies are expected to follow suit as these missions are incredibly profitable for space exploration companies. While scientific exploration missions can cost hundreds of millions, like space stations, space tourism missions require fewer resources. Additionally, wealthy tourists have expressed the desire and the means to pay multi-million dollar sums to experience space travel. For these reasons, the big three in space travel – Blue Origin, SpaceX and Virgin Galactic – will inaugurate the space tourism boom in the years to come.

Next: Trips to Mars Could Take Just 45 Days If You Use Laser Propulsion


Source: Space News

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Space tourism is all yours, for a hefty price https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-is-all-yours-for-a-hefty-price/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-is-all-yours-for-a-hefty-price/ Alright, so it’s a new era, but what does it mean? Do these forays represent a future in which even the average person could book a celestial flight and bask in the splendor of Earth from above? Or is this just another way for the ultra-rich to show off their money while simultaneously ignoring and […]]]>

Alright, so it’s a new era, but what does it mean? Do these forays represent a future in which even the average person could book a celestial flight and bask in the splendor of Earth from above? Or is this just another way for the ultra-rich to show off their money while simultaneously ignoring and exacerbating our existential problems on the ground? Almost all of these 2021 escapades were the result of the efforts of three billionaires: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson. Branson is only a single-digit billionaire, while Bezos and Musk have wealth measured in the hundreds of billions.

“The greatly undue influence of wealth in this country – for me, that’s at the heart of my issues with space tourism as it’s unfolding,” says Linda Billings, a communications researcher who consults for NASA and has writing on the societal impacts of spaceflight for over 30 years. “We’re so far from making this available to your so-called average person.”

Each seat on Virgin’s suborbital spaceplane, the cheapest way to go to space at the moment, will cost someone $450,000. A single seat on Blue Origin’s initial suborbital launch auctioned for $28 million, and the undisclosed price of SpaceX’s all-civilian Inspiration4 mission, which spent three days in orbit before crashing offshore of Florida, was estimated at $50 million. per passenger.

Not only are these thefts ridiculously out of financial reach for the average person, Billings says, they serve no real purpose — far from ideal given our earthly problems of inequality, environmental collapse and global pandemic. “We really don’t learn anything,” she says. “There doesn’t seem to be a lot of thought or awareness among the people engaged in these space tourism missions.”

Laura Forczyk, owner of space consultancy Astralytical, thinks it’s wrong to focus strictly on the financial aspect. “The narrator [last year] I was a billionaire in space, but it’s so much more than that,” says Forczyk, who wrote the book. Become out of the worldpublished in January, in which she interviewed government and private astronauts about why they go to space.

Forczyk sees the flights as great opportunities to conduct scientific experiments. The three commercial tourism companies have conducted research projects in the past, studying things like fluid dynamics, plant genetics and the human body’s response to microgravity. And yes, the wealthy are the target audience, but SpaceX’s Inspiration4 passengers included artist and scientist Sian Proctor and data engineer Chris Sembroski, who won their tickets through contests, as well as the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Ambassador Hayley Arceneaux (the trip helped her raise $200 million in donations for the hospital). Blue Origin offered free trips to aviation pioneer Wally Funk, who as a woman was barred from becoming an Apollo astronaut, and Laura, the daughter of NASA astronaut Alan Shepard.

Forczyk also quotes Iranian space tourist Anousheh Ansari, who flew to the ISS in 2006. “She told how she grew up in a war zone in Iran, and how [the flight] helped her see the world as interconnected,” says Forczyk.

Billings thinks the value of such testimonials is quite low. “All of these people are telling the press about the wonderful experience they had,” she says. “But listening to someone else tell you how exciting it was to climb Mount Everest doesn’t convey the actual experience.”

As with an Everest trek, there is the risk of death to consider. Historically, spaceflight has had a fatality rate of just under 4%, or about 266,000 times higher than commercial aircraft. Virgin suffered two major disasters during testing, killing a total of four employees and injuring four others. “A high-profile accident will come; it’s unavoidable,” says Forczyk. But even that, she predicts, won’t end space tourism. People continue to climb Everest, she notes, despite the danger.

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Space tourism took off in 2021, here’s how it went https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-took-off-in-2021-heres-how-it-went/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-took-off-in-2021-heres-how-it-went/ Launch of Blue Origin’s New Shepard rocket carrying passengers Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and … [+] space tourism company Blue Origin, brother Mark Bezos, Oliver Daemen and Wally Funk from its spaceport near Van Horn, Texas, Tuesday, July 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez) ASSOCIATED PRESS After years – even decades – of waiting, 2021 […]]]>

After years – even decades – of waiting, 2021 was the year space tourism finally kicked off. In the space of 10 short days in July, the commercial spaceflight industry took two leaps and bounds as Virgin Galactic and Blue Origin successfully completed their first flights with paying customers on board.

Although we still don’t have commercial space stations and prices are extremely unaffordable for all but the 1% of the 1%, space tourism is officially here – and here to stay.

Here are some of the highlights of the year’s successful launches and missions, and the people who joined the ranks of “commercial astronauts” as a result of their flights.

July 11 – Virgin Galactic’s first flight

Always one to put on a show, Sir Richard Branson was the first commercial customer to fly into space with his company, Virgin Galactic, in early July. The announcement came quickly, as Branson wanted to reach the edge of space before its competitor, Blue Origin – which it did just 9 days earlier. Branson was joined on board by three VG employees: chief astronaut instructor Beth Moses, vice president of government affairs and researcher Sirisha Bandla (who conducted in-flight experiments), and chief operations engineer by VG Colin Bennett.

On the ground before, during and after the flight from Spaceport America in New Mexico, non-flying guests were treated to a variety of entertainment, including a performance by Khalid.

July 20 – First flight of Blue Origin

On July 20, 52 years after the first moon landing, Blue Origin conducted its first successful consumer flight with founder Jeff Bezos on board. The company launched from its West Texas facility with four passengers on board: Bezos, his brother, aerospace legend Wally Funk, and 18-year-old Oliver Daemen, whose father was one of the bidders. from Blue Origin’s auction for the final seat.

(Anonymous auction winner pulled out days before launch, we later learned was tech/crypto founder Justin Sun, who is now considering buying an entire Blue Origin flight in the future.)

September 15 – Mission Inspiration4

One of the biggest and most enjoyable space tourism stories of the year focused on the Inspiration4 mission, organized and led by US billionaire Jared Isaacman. Isaacman bought a four-person flight on one of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsules and organized his crew which included medical assistant Hayley Arceneaux, geoscientist and science communication specialist Sian Proctor and data engineer Chris Sembroski , the latter two of which won their place through fundraising. campaign for St. Jude Children’s Hospital, where Arceneaux works.

The Inspiration4 crew launched from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A in Florida and spent three days in orbit before crashing off the coast of Florida.

October 13 – Beam Me Up, Scotty

For their second consumer flight, Blue Origin made headlines by inviting none other than Captain Kirk himself to join the flight as a guest. The inimitable William Shatner became the oldest person to visit space at 90 and said it was one of the highlights of his life: “I was so fascinated by what happened passed on this flight. It moved me to tears, so much so that…I couldn’t control my emotions for 15-20 minutes,” Shatner told TIME. in an interview after his flight.

December 8 – First ISS tourist (in a while)

For more than a decade, the only visitors to the International Space Station have been astronauts focused on research and other science projects – and a Russian actress/director who visited earlier in 2021 to film scenes for an upcoming movie. In some ways, it seemed like the days of welcoming tourists to the ISS were over; Canadian businessman Guy Laliberté was the last to go there in 2009.

That changed in December, when Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa arrived with a videographer to spend 12 days aboard the station. Up there, he answered common questions about life in microgravity (including classic toilet problems) and also did some fun experiments to spark interest in space.

Maezawa is expected to perform a flight around the moon with SpaceX at some point in the future; the trip was proposed for 2023 but not confirmed.

December 11 – Hello Earth

To close the year, Blue Origin completed a third successful flight in early December. In addition to several paying customers, including passengers hello america host Michael Strahan and Laura Shepard Churchley, daughter of astronaut Alan Shepard, the first American to reach space and who Blue Origin’s New Shepard the rocket bears his name.

As well as being a TV host, Strahan has a background in professional football and tweeted “TOUCHDOWN has new meaning now!!!” upon his successful return to earth.

Here are more successful flights in 2022, long-time reservations filled for Virgin Galactic patient customers and falling prices.

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2021: a year of space tourism, the rise of China https://newtoncountymotourism.org/2021-a-year-of-space-tourism-the-rise-of-china/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/2021-a-year-of-space-tourism-the-rise-of-china/ From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors. Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew […]]]>

From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors.

Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew entered orbit, and Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth explanation of what it was like to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism was finally taking off. .
Here are the selected highlights.

Red Planet Robot Duo

NASA’s Perseverance Rover has survived its “seven minutes of terror”, a period when the craft relies on its automated systems for descent and landing, to land safely on Mars’ Jezero crater in February.

Since then, the car-sized robot has been taking pictures and drilling samples for its mission: to determine if the Red Planet may have harbored ancient microbial lifeforms.

A rock sample return mission is planned for some time in the 2030s.

With its advanced instruments, “Percy”, as the helicopter is affectionately nicknamed, can also zap Martian rock and chemically analyze steam.

Percy has a partner for the ride: Ingenuity, a four-pound (two-kilogram) rotorcraft that achieved the first powered flight on another celestial body in April, just over a century after the Wright brothers achieved the same feat here on Earth. , and has played many more since.

“Perseverance is kind of the flagship mission, it’s doing a detailed, long-term investigation of this fascinating region of Mars,” Jonathan McDowall, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told AFP.

In contrast, “Ingenuity is one of those cute, small, cheap little tech demos that NASA can do so well,” he added.

Knowledge gained from Ingenuity could help scientists develop Dragonfly, a planned thousand-pound drone helicopter, to search for signs of life on Saturn’s moon Titan in the mid-2030s.

Private space flight takes off

An American millionaire became the world’s first space tourist in 2001, but it took another 20 years for the promise of private spaceflight to finally materialize.

In July, Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson competed against Blue Origin’s Jeff Bezos to be the first non-professional astronaut to perform suborbital spaceflight.

While the British tycoon won that battle within days, it was Blue Origin that took the lead, launching three more flights with paying customers and celebrities.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX entered the fray in September with a three-day orbital mission around Earth with an all-civilian crew on Inspiration 4.

“It’s really exciting that finally, after so long, this stuff is finally happening,” said space industry analyst Laura Seward Forczyk, author of the forthcoming book “Becoming Off-Worldly,” intended to prepare future space travelers.

But it was William Shatner, who played the swordsman Captain Kirk in the 1960s TV series “Star Trek,” who stole the show with a moving account of his experience.

“What you despise is Mother Earth, and she needs to be protected,” he told reporters.

A Russian crew shot the first feature film in space aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2021, and Japanese tourists took their own tour there aboard a Russian rocket.

For a few minutes on December 11, there were a record 19 humans in space when Blue Origin flew its third crewed mission, the Japanese team was on the ISS with their normal crew, and the Chinese taikonauts were in position on their station.

However, the sight of wealthy elites galloping through the cosmos did not please everyone, and the nascent space tourism industry sparked a backlash from some who said there were more problems. pressing issues to face, such as climate change, here on Earth.

Globalization of space

During the Cold War, space was dominated by the United States and the former Soviet Union.

Now, in addition to the explosion of the commercial sector, which is sending out satellites at a dizzying rate, China, India and others are increasingly flexing their spaceflight muscles.

China’s Tiangong (Palace in the Sky) space station – its first long-term outpost – launched in April, while its first Mars rover, Zhurong, landed in May, making it the only second country to achieve such a feat.

“For the past 20 years, since China finally decided to go into space, it’s been in catch-up mode,” McDowall said. “And now they’re kind of over there, and they’re starting to do things that the United States hasn’t done.”

The United Arab Emirates placed a probe in Mars orbit in February, becoming the first Arab nation and the fifth overall to reach the planet.

Meanwhile, Russia launched a missile at one of its own satellites, becoming the fourth country to strike a spacecraft from the ground, reigniting concerns about the growing space arms race.

Washington criticized Moscow for its “reckless” test, which generated more than 1,500 large pieces of orbital debris, dangerous for low Earth orbit missions such as the ISS.

Future…

The year ended with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, a US$10 billion marvel that will use infrared technology to travel back 13 billion years in time.

“It’s arguably the most expensive single science platform ever created,” said Casey Drier, lead attorney for the Planetary Society.

“To push the limits of our knowledge of the cosmos, we had to build something capable of accessing this ancient past,” he added.

It will reach Lagrange Point 2, a space landmark a million miles from Earth, in a few weeks, then start up and gradually calibrate its systems, coming online around June.

Also next year will see the launch of Artemis 1 – when NASA’s Giant Space Launch System (SLS) will carry the Orion capsule to the Moon and back, in preparation for America’s return with humans later this decade.

NASA plans to build lunar habitats and use lessons learned for advanced missions to Mars in the 2030s.

Observers are heartened that the agenda launched by former President Donald Trump has continued under Joe Biden — even if he hasn’t made his support as clear.

Finally, next fall, NASA’s DART probe will hit an asteroid to deflect it from its trajectory.

The proof-of-concept test is a dry run should humanity ever stop a giant space rock from wiping out life on Earth, as seen in Netflix’s new hit movie “Don’t Look Up.”

]]>
A year of space tourism, flights to Mars, the rise of China » Capital News https://newtoncountymotourism.org/a-year-of-space-tourism-flights-to-mars-the-rise-of-china-capital-news/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/a-year-of-space-tourism-flights-to-mars-the-rise-of-china-capital-news/ Washington (AFP), December 30 – From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors. Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final […]]]>

Washington (AFP), December 30 – From the first powered flight of the Mars Ingenuity Helicopter on another world to the launch of the James Webb Telescope that will peer into the early epoch of the Universe, 2021 has been a huge year for humanity’s space endeavors.

Beyond scientific milestones, billionaires battled to reach the final frontier first, an all-civilian crew entered orbit, and Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth explanation of what it was like to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism was finally taking off. .

Here are the selected highlights.

– Red Planet robot duo –

Star Trek’s William Shatner gave an in-depth look at what it meant to see Earth from the cosmos, as space tourism finally came into its own © AFP/File/Patrick T. FALLON

NASA’s Perseverance Rover has survived its “seven minutes of terror”, a period when the craft relies on its automated systems for descent and landing, to land safely on Mars’ Jezero crater in February.

Since then, the car-sized robot has been taking pictures and drilling samples for its mission: to determine if the Red Planet may have harbored ancient microbial lifeforms.

A rock sample return mission is planned for the 2030s.

With its advanced instruments, “Percy”, as the helicopter is affectionately nicknamed, can also zap Martian rock and chemically analyze steam.

Percy has a partner for the ride: Ingenuity, a four-pound (two-kilogram) rotorcraft that achieved the first powered flight on another celestial body in April, just over a century after the Wright brothers achieved the same feat here on Earth. , and has played many more since.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

“Perseverance is kind of the flagship mission, it does a long-term detailed investigation of this fascinating region of Mars,” Jonathan McDowall, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told AFP.

In contrast, “Ingenuity is one of those cute, small, cheap little tech demos that NASA can do so well,” he added.

Knowledge gained from Ingenuity could help scientists develop Dragonfly, a planned thousand-pound drone helicopter, to search for signs of life on Saturn’s moon Titan in the mid-2030s.

– Private space flight takes off –

An American millionaire became the world’s first space tourist in 2001, but it took another 20 years for the promise of private spaceflight to finally materialize.

In July, Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson competed against Blue Origin’s Jeff Bezos to be the first non-professional astronaut to perform suborbital spaceflight.

While the British tycoon won that battle within days, it was Blue Origin that took the lead, launching three more flights with paying customers and celebrities.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX entered the fray in September with a three-day orbital mission around Earth with an all-civilian crew on Inspiration 4.

This NASA photo released on April 27, 2021 shows a black and white image taken by the navigation camera aboard NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter during its third flight to Mars on April 25, 2021 © NASA/AFP/File/Document

“It’s really exciting that finally, after so long, this stuff is finally happening,” said space industry analyst Laura Seward Forczyk, author of the forthcoming book “Becoming Off-Worldly,” intended to prepare future space travelers.

But it was William Shatner, who played the slick Captain Kirk in the 1960s “Star Trek” TV series, who stole the show with a moving account of his experience.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

“What you despise is Mother Earth, and she needs to be protected,” he told reporters.

A Russian crew shot the first feature film in space aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2021, and Japanese tourists took their own tour there aboard a Russian rocket.

For a few minutes on December 11, there were a record 19 humans in space when Blue Origin flew its third crewed mission, the Japanese team was on the ISS with their normal crew, and the Chinese taikonauts were in position on their station.

However, the sight of wealthy elites galloping through the cosmos did not please everyone, and the nascent space tourism industry sparked a backlash from some who said there were more problems. pressing issues to face, such as climate change, here on Earth.

– Globalization of space –

Students watch a live image of a lesson given by Chinese astronauts from China’s Tiangong space station at a school in Yantai, eastern China’s Shandong province © AFP/STR

During the Cold War, space was dominated by the United States and the former Soviet Union.

Now, in addition to the explosion of the commercial sector, which is sending out satellites at a dizzying rate, China, India and others are increasingly flexing their spaceflight muscles.

China’s Tiangong (palace in the sky) space station – its first long-term outpost – launched in April, while its first Mars rover, Zhurong, landed in May, making it the only second country to achieve such a feat.

“For the past 20 years, since China finally decided to go big in space, it’s been in catch-up mode,” McDowall said. “And now they’re kind of over there, and they’re starting to do things that the United States hasn’t done.”

The United Arab Emirates placed a probe in Mars orbit in February, becoming the first Arab nation and the fifth overall to reach the planet.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

Meanwhile, Russia launched a missile at one of its own satellites, becoming the fourth country to strike a spacecraft from the ground, reigniting concerns about the growing space arms race.

Washington criticized Moscow for its “reckless” test, which generated more than 1,500 large pieces of orbital debris, dangerous for low Earth orbit missions such as the ISS.

– Coming soon… –

Arianespace’s Ariane 5 rocket with NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope on board rises from the launch pad, at the European Spaceport, Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana, December 25, 2021 © AFP / jody amiet

The year ended with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, a $10 billion marvel that will use infrared technology to travel back 13 billion years in time.

“It’s arguably the most expensive single science platform ever created,” said Planetary Society lead advocate Casey Drier.

“To push the limits of our knowledge of the cosmos, we had to build something capable of accessing this ancient past,” he added.

It will reach Lagrange Point 2, a space landmark a million miles from Earth, in a few weeks, then start up and gradually calibrate its systems, coming online around June.

Also next year will see the launch of Artemis 1 – when NASA’s Giant Space Launch System (SLS) will carry the Orion capsule to the Moon and back, in preparation for America’s return with humans later this decade.

NASA plans to build lunar habitats and use lessons learned for advanced missions to Mars in the 2030s.

Observers are heartened that the agenda launched by former President Donald Trump has continued under Joe Biden – even if he hasn’t been as vocal in his support.

Advertising. Scroll to continue reading.

Finally, next fall, NASA’s DART probe will hit an asteroid to deflect it from its trajectory.

The proof-of-concept test is a dry run should humanity ever stop a giant space rock from wiping out life on Earth, as seen in Netflix’s new hit movie “Don’t Look Up.”

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Weekend special: Will the phenomenal rise in space tourism benefit the world?, World News https://newtoncountymotourism.org/weekend-special-will-the-phenomenal-rise-in-space-tourism-benefit-the-world-world-news/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/weekend-special-will-the-phenomenal-rise-in-space-tourism-benefit-the-world-world-news/ The world is changing at a rapid pace. What was special before is common now. Space travel has also seen it lately. In the past, only scientific explorers ventured into space to find multiple answers, but now it has become a way to spend free time. Due to advancement and commercialization, space tourism has become […]]]>

The world is changing at a rapid pace. What was special before is common now.

Space travel has also seen it lately. In the past, only scientific explorers ventured into space to find multiple answers, but now it has become a way to spend free time.

Due to advancement and commercialization, space tourism has become a reality.

Several large conglomerates have entered this very lucrative arena.

Also Read: SpaceX Sends Detergent Into Space To Help Astronauts Wash Clothes

Not only that, competition in the industry has already intensified. These days, Elon Musk’s SpaceX runs missions to send tourists into space. He also worked on several other missions in coordination with NASA.

Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin also made their maiden flights. Many billionaires, such as Japanese tycoon Yusaku Maezawa, Branson and others, have visited space before.

Besides the billionaires, several others have also reached space or the International Space Station.

The American company Space Adventures, headed by Tom Shelley, sent about eight tourists to the ISS.

Read also | Watch: Finally, the groundbreaking James Webb Space Telescope scales the skies this Christmas

The industry also faces significant criticism due to its carbon footprint. This comes at a time when the world is looking to tackle climate change in a do or die situation.

Some companies use cleaner fuel for space travel, but others don’t.

Virgin Galactic said it plans to run 400 flights a year in the future. This shows that the popularity of space tourism will surely increase.

This can lead to a huge amount of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore important to find the right balance between advancing in the form of space tourism and solving the problems of climate change.

Thus, this type of tourism can help transport people to other planets, but it can lead to the destruction of the Earth.

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Russia ready to “fight” for the supremacy of space tourism https://newtoncountymotourism.org/russia-ready-to-fight-for-the-supremacy-of-space-tourism/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/russia-ready-to-fight-for-the-supremacy-of-space-tourism/ After a decade-long hiatus, Russia is relaunching an ambitious bid to dominate the burgeoning global space tourism industry, jostling with zealous billionaires, the United States and rising China. Russia flaunted its comeback this month by sending two cosmic adventurers – Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant – to the International Space Station (ISS) on […]]]>


After a decade-long hiatus, Russia is relaunching an ambitious bid to dominate the burgeoning global space tourism industry, jostling with zealous billionaires, the United States and rising China.

Russia flaunted its comeback this month by sending two cosmic adventurers – Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and his assistant – to the International Space Station (ISS) on its first tourist launch in 12 years.

For all the latest news, follow the Daily Star’s Google News channel.

Building on this success, Firebrand space chief Dmitry Rogozin spoke about Russia’s next steps towards supremacy: a special module at the ISS for Russian visitors, spacewalks outside from the station and, later, trips around the moon.

“We will not give the Americans this slot. We are ready to fight for it,” he told reporters at a press conference as Maezawa headed to the ISS on a 12-day mission. .

Yet Russia’s path to industry dominance is fraught with new hurdles that have emerged since it last emerged ten years ago.

At the time, the Russian space agency Roscosmos had a monopoly on sending curious people into space. That changed when U.S. agency NASA pulled its own astronaut shuttle back in 2011 and reclaimed all of the ISS seats Roscosmos had to offer for the next decade.

Then, last year, billionaire Elon Musk’s SpaceX burst onto the scene with its first successful ISS mission and NASA jettisoned Roscosmos.

At a reported $ 90 million per seat, it was a financial blow to the cash-strapped Russian space agency, simultaneously hit by budget cuts and corruption scandals.

Analysts say Roscosmos has no choice but to look to tourism to fill the gap. “The Russian space industry depends on consistent orders for these launches,” industry analyst Vitaly Yegorov told AFP.

The price of a seat – estimated at between $ 50 million and $ 60 million – covers the cost of building the three-person Soyuz spacecraft to transport the crew, he said, while a second traveler makes a profit . But space tourism isn’t just about money, officials say.

“It’s a national prestige. Young people are interested in human spaceflight. It’s the future, after all,” said Dmitry Loskutov, director of Glavkosmos, a Roscosmos subsidiary responsible for commercial projects, including tourism.

Russia, China and the United States are the only countries capable of manned flight, but a multitude of newcomers are entering the scene and forcing Russia to step up its game, SpaceX among them.

Musk has yet to take any tourists to the ISS, but this year his Inspiration4 brought an all-civilian crew into Earth orbit for a three-day mission.

Amazon Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos and billionaire Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic are also eager to be cut. Their two spacecraft made their maiden voyage this year, remaining weightless for several minutes before returning to Earth.

But Andrei Ionin of the Russian Academy of Cosmonautics says you just can’t compare billionaires’ brief low-orbit flights to a multi-day mission to the ISS. “It’s like comparing Ferrari and the Renault market,” he said.

Loskutov echoed this point, saying that travel is more of the “entertainment industry” than space travel.

Still, Yegorov said, “the competition is increasing,” especially from SpaceX. Russia has taken note of this. He wants to expand his offerings, including a spacewalk on an upcoming tourism mission, Loskutov said.

Moscow also unveiled plans for its own orbital station with the ISS which is expected to retire within the next decade and Rogozin said there may be a “separate tourist module” on board.

He raised the possibility of new routes, for example by following the path of the first human in space, the Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin.

Rogozin also said that after 2030, Roscosmos hopes to offer a trip around the moon.

But that timeline lags far behind SpaceX’s ambitions – it has announced a mission to take eight people around the moon as early as 2023. Another complication Roscosmos faces in the industry is to assess and meet demand.

On the one hand, Soyuz spacecraft are expensive and a mission takes at least two years to organize.

Loskutov said Russia has pre-ordered a rocket for the next launch, and Rogozin has asked his agency to increase production of Soyuz.

Real demand – not just interest – is also difficult to assess. Applicants should be prepared to shell out, meet health requirements, and commit to months of training and a period of re-education after returning to Earth. “In my opinion, it isn’t crowded – but you don’t need a lot anyway,” Ionin said.

At least for now, he said, Russia is ahead thanks to the Soyuz designed and tested by the Soviets. “For the next five to ten years there is no threat to Roscosmos’ business,” Ionin added.


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Space tourism drives interest in advanced science on Earth https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-drives-interest-in-advanced-science-on-earth/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-drives-interest-in-advanced-science-on-earth/ After another successful Blue Origin launch this weekend marked the third civilian ride on the spacecraft owned by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, work on Earth to advance science in space continues. A program called Pangea, run by the European Space Agency, gives astronauts lessons in real-world geology for future out-of-this-world missions. “Today, we are essentially […]]]>

After another successful Blue Origin launch this weekend marked the third civilian ride on the spacecraft owned by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, work on Earth to advance science in space continues.

A program called Pangea, run by the European Space Agency, gives astronauts lessons in real-world geology for future out-of-this-world missions.

“Today, we are essentially trained to perform the same activities in space, whether aboard the International Space Station or in the future on the lunar surface, regardless of our journey,” said the astronaut Andreas Mogensen.

The Pangea program is three weeks of intensive learning. At each location, astronauts and space scientists take courses and use virtual reality, followed by field trips to see what they might also find elsewhere on Earth.

“So it’s likely that we would land near, for example, a crater or maybe a lava flow channel, or if it’s on Mars, maybe what we think is an ancient bed. river or lake where there could potentially have been flowing water in the past,” Mogensen said.

For space enthusiasts on the ground, watching the weekend launch in West Texas could hopefully renew a spirit of exploration, where science in space can advance science on Earth.

“I have to sit here and watch something that I will never see again and have never seen before,” said space enthusiast Kenny Sligery.

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Space tourism takes off. You probably can’t afford it – yet https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-takes-off-you-probably-cant-afford-it-yet/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/space-tourism-takes-off-you-probably-cant-afford-it-yet/ It totally lacks any atmosphere or nightlife. At various times, he lacks night, period, and he has a legendary “dark side”. Yet within the next 15 years, the moon could become a tourist destination, according to space tourism experts. “I think it’s entirely possible,” said Rachel JC Fu, chair of the department of tourism, hospitality, […]]]>

It totally lacks any atmosphere or nightlife. At various times, he lacks night, period, and he has a legendary “dark side”.

Yet within the next 15 years, the moon could become a tourist destination, according to space tourism experts.

“I think it’s entirely possible,” said Rachel JC Fu, chair of the department of tourism, hospitality, and event management at the University of Florida. “I think technology can catch up with our imagination.”

Decades after the first manned space flights, space is becoming the new frontier of tourism, said Derek Webber, founder of Spaceport Associates, a space tourism consultancy.

Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa plans to take eight artists on lunar orbital missions in 2023, and his The dearMoon project claims to have a million applicants.

two companies, The blue origin of Jeff Bezos and Galactic Virgo, already offer suborbital flights. Two months after his highly publicized venture in which STar Trek legend William Shatner participated, Blue Origin launched another flight on Saturday morning from his Texas site, this one featuring a TV celebrity and former NFL star (and the Eagles’ nemesis) Michael Strahan.

The first two Blue Origin flights carried six passengers, and six were on board Saturday.

READ MORE: ‘Star Trek’ Actor William Shatner TV Captain Kirk Explodes in Space

Space X could offer orbital flights “very soon” Webber said, adding that a commercial company could even beat NASA to Mars. “Certainly the data shows that people want to go there,” he said.

Webber and other proponents say it’s not madness, that space tourism holds enormous potential economic, scientific, environmental and even existential benefits.

Not everyone agrees with the move, and it has raised questions about security, national priorities and damage to the atmosphere.

Despite these reservations, for whatever reason — and Fu says fatigue from COVID-19 may be a factor — many people want to get away from it all.

If you dream of traveling in space, know that it will cost you a little more than a SEPTA train ride to Paoli.

Bezos said Blue Origin has already sold $100 million worth of tickets for suborbital flights.

READ MORE: Billionaire Richard Branson reaches space in his own ship

While the company declined to disclose ticket prices, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University professor Erik Seeder estimated they could cost up to $400,000 each.

The price of an orbital flight would be in the order of $55 million, he added, and suffice it to say that the cost of a return ticket to the Moon would be astronomical.

A more affordable option might be the Neptune spaceship “space balloon,” at just $125,000 per person, including free Wi-Fi. And it wouldn’t require the 14 hours of in-flight training Blue Origin passengers were required to complete under FAA regulations. The company, Space Perspective, calls it a “radically smooth” experience requiring “minimal” preparation.

The “capsule” will rise about 20 miles at around 12 mph and will give passengers a spectacular view of the planet and provide what company founder Jane Poynter calls “a unifying and profound encounter”.

While this may fall short of conventional definitions of “space”, Webber points out that the atmosphere has no hard boundaries, it “just gets thinner and thinner”. At 20 miles, according to the company, passengers will have a view of 450 miles in all directions.

But don’t get your hopes up: the company says it’s sold out through 2024.

While space ventures could be great experiences for the ultra-rich and well-connected, other earthlings could fall victim to collateral damage, said University College London professor Eloise Marais.

If the industry “expands significantly”, the emissions could both degrade the ozone layer which filters out harmful UV rays and contribute to global warming. She added that although Blue Origin’s current rocket does not produce carbon dioxide, its next iteration will use CO2-producing methane.

University of Central Florida professor Asli DA Tasci agrees on the environmental risks and calls space tourism a “dangerous business” for participants. In 2014, a Virgin Galactic spacecraft exploded during a test in the Mojave Desert, killing the pilot.

Prince William of England argued that dealing with issues closer to the Earth’s surface would be a more responsible investment.

READ MORE: Billionaires’ space frolics mean mega-pollution for the planet | Opinion

Webber counters that these are short-sighted opinions.

“That’s how aviation began. Only the very wealthy could fly in the early days (and suffer the risk and discomfort),” he said. “And through the revenue generated by their expensive airfares, it has become possible for the airline industry to emerge, to become safer, more routine, much cheaper and almost ubiquitous.”

Astronauts said they were in awe of the planet as they saw it from space and had a strong sense of responsibility for it, a phenomenon known as the “overview effect”. The term was coined in a 1987 book by writer and philosopher Frank White, who interviewed astronauts about their experiences.

“It would probably help even more if rich and influential people had it,” Webber said, “because in principle they might be able to do something to get the word out.”

Ultimately, he said, it could happen that people could fly anywhere on the planet, across 12 time zones, in 45 minutes.

Since it’s still a nascent industry that will take years to mature, it’s impossible to predict which companies will thrive and endure, Fu said.

That said, she added, “The sky is no longer the limit.”

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FAA withdraws astronaut wing program as race for commercial space tourism intensifies https://newtoncountymotourism.org/faa-withdraws-astronaut-wing-program-as-race-for-commercial-space-tourism-intensifies/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://newtoncountymotourism.org/faa-withdraws-astronaut-wing-program-as-race-for-commercial-space-tourism-intensifies/ Fox News’ Kat Timpf reacts to astronaut allegedly damaging plane after breaking up on ‘Kennedy’. The Federal Aviation Administration will retire its Commercial Space Astronaut Wings program as the number of manned spaceflights is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years. BLUE ORIGIN FLIGHT: WHAT TO KNOW, HOW TO WATCH The Commercial Space Astronaut […]]]>

The Federal Aviation Administration will retire its Commercial Space Astronaut Wings program as the number of manned spaceflights is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years.

BLUE ORIGIN FLIGHT: WHAT TO KNOW, HOW TO WATCH

The Commercial Space Astronaut Wings program, established in 2004 by Patti Grace Smith, former associate administrator of the FAA’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation, is designed to recognize pilots and flight crew who have advanced the agency’s mission of promote the development of vehicles for manned spaceflight. . Smith died in 2016 at the age of 68 after a battle with pancreatic cancer.

“With three commercial space companies now licensed by the FAA to fly spaceflight participants, and companies conducting operations, his vision is largely realized,” the agency said.

Instead of issuing the wings, the agency will recognize individuals reaching space on its website beginning in 2022. Anyone who is on an FAA-cleared or cleared launch and reaches 50 statute miles above the surface of the Earth will be listed on the site. .

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On Friday, the FAA announced it would award astronaut wings to 15 individuals who qualified through private space travel in 2021. Additionally, the agency is awarding honorary astronaut wings to Michael Alsbury and Peter Siebold , two Scaled Composite test pilots who were involved in the 2014 crash of Virgin Galactic’s first SpaceShipTwo spacecraft. Alsbury was killed in the crash. Siebold was injured but survived.

The latest awards bring the total number of people who received the distinction as part of the 24-hour program, including:

In this photo provided by Blue Origin, from left to right: Mark Bezos, brother of Jeff Bezos; Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and space tourism company Blue Origin; Oliver Daemen from the Netherlands; and Texas aviation pioneer Wally Funk. (Blue origin via AP)

  • Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson and the crew of Unity 22, which launched July 11. Pilots David Mackay and Michael Masucci and chief astronaut instructor Beth Moses previously got their wings on the company’s VF-01 mission in 2019.

Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson poses with the crew of the Unity 22 spacecraft (Galactic Virgo)

This undated photo made available by Blue Origin in October 2021 shows, from left, Chris Boshuizen, William Shatner, Audrey Powers and Glen de Vries. (Blue origin via AP) (AP Newsroom)

  • SpaceX Inspiration 4 crew members Jared Isaacman, Haylely Arceneaux, Dr. Sian Proctor and Chris Sembroski, who blasted off to space on September 15.
Inspiration4 will launch Sept. 15 from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, SpaceX announced in a press release Friday.

Inspiration4’s all-civilian crew consists of Mission Specialist Chris Sembroski, leftmost, Mission Pilot Dr. Sian Proctor, Mission Commander Jared Isaacman, and Medic Hayley Arceneaux. (SpaceX/Inspiration 4)

Scaled Composites test pilot Michael Melville, who flew SpaceShipOne on Virgin Galactic’s Flight 15FP and Flight 16FP missions in 2004, was the first to earn astronaut wings through the program. The second was Scaled Composites test pilot Brian Binnie, who piloted SpaceShipOne on the company’s Flight 17P mission in 2004.

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Blue Origin plans to launch its third manned spaceflight with six crew members on Saturday morning, who will also be eligible to receive commercial astronaut wings.

“Good Morning America” ​​co-host Michael Strahan and Laura Shepard Churchley, the eldest daughter of astronaut Alan Shepard, will fly as guests of honor. Voyager Space Holdings CEO Dylan Taylor, investor Evan Dick, Bess Ventures founder Lane Bess and his son Cameron will join the flight as paying customers. The company previously said it planned to launch “several” crewed and payload flights in 2022.

Crew of Blue Origin NS-19 (Credit: Blue Origin)

Blue Origin NS-19 Crew (blue origin)

Virgin Galactic will perform two more crewed test flights, Unity 23 and Unity 24, before commencing commercial spaceflight. Virgin’s first commercial spaceflight, Unity 25, is scheduled to begin in the fourth quarter of 2022. In November, the company said it sold about 100 seats for its future commercial spaceflights at $450,000 apiece, bringing its total reservations to 700.

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Meanwhile, SpaceX is expected to launch NASA’s Crew-4 mission in April 2022 and Crew-5 mission no earlier than Fall 2022. Additionally, NASA has announced plans to buy three more trade crew missions, with the first launch starting as early as 2023.

SpaceX also hopes to launch the first uncrewed orbital test flight of its Starship vehicle in January, subject to the completion of the Federal Aviation Administration’s environmental review of the spacecraft’s orbital launch site in Boca Chica, Texas. , by the end of 2021. Starship will be used to transport humans to the Moon, Mars and beyond.

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